Blog Entries With Tag: stroke


Posted: Mar 6, 2015

The other day I emptied out a 4 kg (about 10 lbs) of white sugar that I had dated a year ago when I opened it.  I use white sugar purely for cooking (I make my own bread, so have to proof the yeast usually with sugar or honey depending on the recipe). 

I'd posted on my Facebook page about emptying out this bag after a yearand asked the question .... how much sugar do you go through in a year?

Here's a few of the responses (names have been removed to protect their privacy):

  • I probably go through about 8 4-lb bags a year. I bake roughly 40 dozen cookies and 15 or more banana bread at Christmas time. I looove to bake. 
  • I bake a lot so maybe 10-20lbs a year!
  • My 1 cup was for visitors coffee/tea.. I personally do not use sugar.. I use stevia/Sucralose.
  • Don't use it, ever. I'm not much of a baker, so I'm sure that helps! My husband and I don't even keep sugar in our home.
  • We do not buy or have sugar in the house unless you count a packet or two from coffee my husband brings home from Starbucks. I do not have or use artificial sweeteners either. I take that back. We bought sugar a long time ago for hummingbird food which my husband makes. I do not even know where he keeps it. Hmmmm ..
  • Don't ever buy white sugar - only bake orange flax bran muffins, and they need 1 cup brown sugar, but we use a mix Brown Sugar Splenda, which needs only half measure, so very, very little for 24 muffins. We do buy some turbinado sugar, a type of brown sugar, of which I like a tiny sprinkle, over my microwaved apple. (allergic to raw apples).

So, there you have it, various answers to my question ... and to the Humming Bird poster  ... I use sugar for my feeder too ... so that's how I used up the 4 kg bag of sugar <lol>.

Picture above courtesy of Scrollgirl at Lumberjocks

_______________

What brought me to this subject today though was coming across an article at The Heart and Stroke website in Canada ( I skip all over the place for reading online). What it states is, and we don't really have to be told this is ...

" Consuming too much sugar is associated with heart disease, stroke, obesity, diabetes, high blood cholesterol, cancer and cavities "

Duhhhh, I know that, though maybe being diabetic makes me more conscious of eating foods with sugar due to how it affects our blood sugar, as well as causing weight gain if we eat too much sweet stuff, even with giving the right amount of insulin to keep the blood sugars (BGNow) at a good level.

Again, it's all about how much you consume, and if you don't want to consume it, that is fine as well!! I know many people who don't use sugar in their coffee (I'm like one of the posters on my wall, I use a small amount of turbinado sugar into my coffee ... and my husband ... he drinks it black ... ugh).

And, to get you even more excited about sugar ..... NOT ...


" For an average 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, 10 per cent is about 48 grams, or 12 teaspoons of sugar. One can of pop contains about 85 per cent of the daily added sugar limit "

So, if this blog has perked your interest about the evils of sugar (it's not ALL evil, just watch what you eat) - check out this link to find out sugar reduction tips by The Heart and Stroke Foundation!

Remember too, which is what I follow religiously .....

" Cooking at home more often will help you reduce sugar in your meals "

Though next week in Las Vegas at the Diabetes unConference - who knows what I'll be eating / drinking in the after hours of the conference, so I'd better walk it off, or else face weight gain, and higher blood sugars! LOL

 

NB:  I thought I'd written about sugar consumption before ... click on this this link from October 2013 ... and you'll find more on the subject.

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Tags: Heart and Stroke Foundation (1) cavities (1) cancer (1) high blood cholesterol (1) diabetes (1) obesity (1) stroke (1) heart disease (1)
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Posted: Jun 15, 2014

I’ve been dealing with feeling tired the last few years.  I mean REALLY REALLY tired. No energy to do much that is active, use of sponge brain, yadda, yadda, yadda.  It’s like I can sleep 10 hours – and still feel like I’m needing more.  It’s like I’m a teenager again …. NOT!!  Though maybe I could redo my life if I could go in a time machine.

Another thing is my DH has told me that once in awhile, I sound like I’m not breathing.  I’m surprised he is awake to hear me gasping, or snorting (I usually wake myself up to that – EMBARASSING).  My DH tends to sleep like the dead – in an ER crisis, in order to wake him up is  very difficult.  I mean imagine trying to wake up someone as the house is filling up with smoke, and one of their eyes is open, you think they’re looking at you, but they’re not registering your poking/yelling for at least 5 minutes.  Yuppers, that’s my sleeping beauty DH …. once he hits the hay  …. He’s out for the count.  I’ll talk about this abit later after I’ve done my bit of education about sleep apnoea.

Yuppers, that’s what my GP thinks I may have.  I thought my being so fatigued, more so then I ever used to be was due to a sleuth of things, depression, peri-menopause, recent thyroid problems.  She says it could be part of it, but after she heard my DH explaining how I sound – she decided to send me to a sleep clinic.  I could have waited 6 months for the public system to be taken care of here in Canada, but luckily my DH’s medical insurance covers 80% of the initial $500 test (ouch).  That’s just for the apparatus that you see me wearing in the picture below – for two days.  Yes, I am Borg Woman … hear me roar … I mean snore … I mean snort … I mean …. Fill in blank _____________ for your own amusement.

Sleep apnoea according to the American Sleep Apnea Association if left untreated  “ can have serious and life-shortening consequences: high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, automobile accidents caused by falling asleep at the wheel, diabetes, depression, and other ailments.

So far, I’ve not fallen asleep at the wheel, though talking to the Respiratory Therapist (RT) at SAS here in Montreal, she says she has.  Scary stuff, since  I know my BIL did at one time, scrapping up against a highway girder (wee bit of damage to his passenger side – no biggie he says).  He blamed that on overtime work/playtime, etc.   Who knows,  maybe he’s got sleep apnoea too?  I know he yawns a lot when he’s at our place for a meal, or maybe it’s due to my being such a boring conversationalist? 

Breathing/sleeping problems are also correlated with Type 2 diabetes diagnosis according to a recent study published by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA).  OSA is the most common form of apneoa - e.g. " OSA may have effects on glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes ".  Hmmm, along with that comes hypertension, stroke, heart failure.  Who knew that having a good sound sleep could be the cure all for some of us with health issues?

I know when I posted about doing the test last week on my Facebook wall – a few responded with the joys of using a C.P.A.P machines  (not cheap with prices averaging $1K for just the machine).  I’m just not sure about being hooked up to a machine, having to lug it around when I travel along with oxygen tank(s).  I find since going onto an insulin pump – what I lug with me now is way more than I used to bring – so imagine having to transport this type of stuff!!  I’d have to hire a Himalayan porter!  On top of that, I twist and turn in the bed like I’m dancing to a Beatles tune – so I’m wondering if I wind up strangling myself – or sleeping worse due to worrying about it.

I did explain to the RT at SAS that having diabetes and the fear of having a hypo (low blood sugar) overnight – is perhaps why I don’t sleep as well as some folks do.  I’ve always been used to dealing with hypos on my own – not having anyone around to aid me like some of the great D-Parent’s  out there that lose sleep worrying about this child going low.  I think it’s just in our nature as Type 1 diabetics – to always be on the ALERT – and I doubt I’ll ever change.

One thing, one person told me that once they removed their dentures at night time (after almost 30 years of wearing them continually - and driving their spouse bonkers) - they no longer had breathing problems.  Sadly, my teeth are not remobable ... yet ... but I did come across an oral dental device when looking for some pictures for this blog.  The wearer has a type of mouth guard that does away with the C.P.A.P machine.  I know I do have a bite guard for my teeth grinding (according to my dentist my rear molars teeth are wearing down).  I've worn the device from time to time - and it does sort of prop my mouth open similar to the device shown at the website.  Hmmm, to have twisted tube and machine by my side or a mouth apparatus .... decisions, decisions!!

 

So, test results will be known in July – I’ll keep you posted!  Psst, anyone have any toothpicks I can borrow to keep my eyes open in the meantime?

Picture courtesy of Kitty Cassandra at http://www.kittycassandra.com/

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Posted: Apr 14, 2013
I had my birthday last week, and the way I celebrated it was to attend a JDRF Symposium a few hours drive away from my home here in Quebec in the province next door, Ontario.
 
What a blast – being with others that are wishing  to find a CURE* for T1D's (Type 1 Diabetics). What I found the most interesting, that at this symposium they were discussing research aimed at older T1D’s  –  not just the younger ones which has always seemed to be the research topic discussions in the past at the symposiums I have attended over the years.  They are looking ahead – at those of us who were young T1D’s at some point in our life (I was diagnosed in the 60’s) – and living our lives to the fullest with all the new research and innovations – while we wait for that CURE.

Doctor Irene Hramiak from the University of Western Ontario (UWO) was the research doctor that night who presented her role in a  project called REducing With MetfOrmin Vascular Adverse Lesions in Type 1 Diabetes (REMOVAL).  The aim is to test whether 3 years treatment with metformin added to insulin therapy to reduce thickening of the arteries and prevent cardiovascular disease in T1 diabetics.  Heart disease is one of the many problems that diabetics can develop over the years due to the ups and downs of our blood sugar and diabetes control – not all of us can attain a purrfect  4.5-6% A1C that a non-diabetic has.

The study will be monitoring the thickness of the arteries in the neck, which is a marker used to predict the risk of future heart attacks and strokes (and yes, while she was talking about this, I was touching my fingers around my neck).  Also, the study will test the drug’s effects on the control of diabetes and treatment.  One of the small drawbacks of the recepient being on the actual Metformin maybe stomach discomfort and/or diarrhea (which one of my Ottawa friends who is going on this project says might help them lose weight as well as get better control of their A1C).

For those that do partake, of course they'll either be on the drug or they won't, and will be clossely monitored to ensure that they stay in good control (that would be my greatest concern as a test guinea pig).  The criteria fo taking part in this tudy is that you have to be over 40 years of age, had diabetes for more than 5 years or more, with an A1C above 7% but under 10%.  There is other criteria in order to take part in this trial which you can find at this link.  Note that this trial is being conducted in the UK, Australia, Denmark, and the Netherlands and they maybe recruiting as we speak (for Canadians - the deadline is rapidly approaching for participants as they hope to start in the next few months). 

Art made of syringes by Dana Heffern
*
When I posted about attending this symposium last week on Facebook a few long time T1D's like myself got their feathers a wee bit ruffled (very attractive to a bird loving cat like myself I might add). They were disillusioned by JDRF's  promise of “a cure will be found in 5 years”.  That is perhaps an old statement they used many moons ago but so far over the years I've attended JDRF symposiums there are no longer make promises made like that.  JDRF's goal all along has been to, and I quote - " improve the lifes of every person affected by T1D by accelerating progress on the most promising opportunities for curing, better treating, and preventing the disease.
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Posted: Aug 26, 2009

Hostess Twinkie

As we all know, sugar has no nutritional value.  It makes food taste good, who can't deny that?  I know I can't.  I'm a diabetic, and I still use sugar in my coffee. Granted, I make myself feel better by saying "I use raw sugar" - but let's face facts - it's sugar - 10g of carb for a teaspoon of sugar!  Many people who eat sugar laiden food are not eating healthy food (are Twinkies healthy - they taste so good?) and of course there are the calories that are involved in high sugar. Which results in high calories and if we don't burn those off - well - you know where it ends up (I'm looking down at my belly here as I type this out - yikes).

I came across a Good Morning America episode today - that was informing the viewers about sugar consumption in the American population (though I think this applies all over).  Did you know that the average person a day consumes .... 21 teaspoons of sugar a day?  The American Heart Association (AHA) is recommending that we reduce that amount of sugar consumption by a third - to only 7 ½ teaspoons a day. 

Also, what was amazing - was when the doctor being interviewed (Doctor Johnson)  said that a single can of pop drink contains 10 to 12 teaspoons of sugar!  Ouch!  I mean I know they are high in sugar - who hasn't consumed a Coke when they need to fix a hypo (I have) - but there is that much sugar in just a can of pop floors me.   He continued to point out that boys (do girls not consume as much I wonder?) from the ages of 14-18 consume on average 35 teaspoons of sugar a day.

Reducing the amount of sugar we consume will of course help reduce our chances of having heart attacks, strokes and of course diabetes.  They are all related in many ways to our love of sugar in our diets.

I know that my parents many years ago decided to cut out excess sugar from their diets.  I'm not sure if it was because of my being a diabetic - but they have managed to wean themselves off of it in their tea and coffee and they also don't eat many sweet things.  Being of British descent - where we are known for bad  teeth (though have been told that's due to the bad dentistry at the time) - that's quite something else.  They are both in excellent health and they are in the 70's - so perhaps cutting out sugar has helped them - along with healthy eating.  I am hoping I can say the same thing when I reach their age - as I'm sure we all feel the same way.

To view the video - as well as read up abit more about our consumption of sugar - go to this link.

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