Blog Entries With Tag: intolerance


Posted: Jun 28, 2013

Love me - I'm a cow - moo!!Recently I got together with some friends from high school.  Sadly, it wasn’t for a happy occasion, like we have done in the past, but for saying good bye to a good friend of ours, who had battled breast cancer for 5 years, and sadly lost to it, as it invaded their body.   I didn’t realise until last w/e when we got together to raise a glass to her time their time here on planet Earth – that they had become diabetic during those years.   All of you know, from my past blogs and statements I’ve made within the social media …. “ if they’d had diabetes – they would be alive today “.

I found out that many have now become Type 2 diabetes (T2D).  As one of my friends put it – their whole family has it – so they “inherited” it.  I had to hold my tongue back on their statement, as I’m still on the fence post about whether Type 2 is passed on.  I am under the belief that the rise of Type 2 diabetes has a lot to do with how we now lead our lives, such as inactivity, foods that are eaten … the list goes on.

One thing I performed as soon as I arrived at my friend’s house for the good bye party – was test my blood sugar (BG) after the 2 hour drive.  I’m getting better now, as an insulin dependent gal to test before I hit the road.  I pulled out my little Lolita who was interviewed a few years ago otherwise known as my FreeStyle Lite meter.   Of course, they thought this was a nifty little meter (I have cool skins for it).  They thought I was such a good diabetic to be testing my BG, but of course, with wine and food awaiting me, I wanted to make sure I’d be in the good zone (neither going low or high).

One thing that one of my Type 2 Diabetic (T2D) friends told me when we started  talking about my scribbles here at Diabetes1.org and my Facebook/Twitter posts – was how different we feel when we go either low or high.  For myself, I feel tired when I go low, and when I go high, which isn’t too often, I don’t tend to feel much different.  For them, it was going high that made them feel tired.   Maybe being a Type 2 diabetic – the symptoms of our blood sugar number varies?

One of them is using Victoza  – which according to my Mum – her sister uses – and it appears to be working for helping her shed weight/keep BG's balanced BUT apparently she has become lactose intolerant since starting on it.  I asked my friend if he had some of the symptoms that my Aunt has – and they said yes (they love cheese like I do – it’s a low carb food!!!).  It’s hard to say after reading the link above on Victoza if the stomach/bowel problems could be all due to lactose intolerance – since this is a common complaint of many Victoza users.  Therefore, the only way to find out if you are lactose intolerant is to either do it the inexpensive way – of cutting out lactose products – and then reintroducing them OR the more scientific way of knowing for sure – is a hydrogen breath test.  
Picture credit of breath test - Phineas H/Flickr
It’s hard though to really pin it just on the Victoza – since lactose intolerance is also common with osteoporosis, osteopenia, pain, high blood pressure, depression to name a few.

The other scenario –since symptoms are similar is having a wheat and gluten intolerance.   It’s an iffy there as far as self testing goes –as you can tell by this link from the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA).  

Just remember –anything you read on the Internet – even from me – ALWAYS question your health care practitioner. about what is happening if you’re taking Victoza or have other health problems. Take note of some of the things you’ve read here – and be an advocate of your own health!!  If you don’t ask – you’ll never know.

Hmmm, the things I learn about when I start to research for a simple blog!

Picture of two cows breaking up - from my DairyFreeDream blog site

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Posted: Oct 13, 2011

UPDATE:  Here's a recent  link that might help you understand this condition that affects Type 1 diabetics - https://www.verywell.com/the-gluten-free-diabetes-diet-562996 - but please feel free to carry on reading below - and pass on this information to anyone you think might find it useful!

FatCatAnna June 2, 2017

* * * * *

Lately I’ve been noticing that quite a few diabetics I meet (mainly young ones) have been diagnosed with celiac (or coeliac) disease.  What is it?  It’s a condition that damages the lining of the small intestine and prevents it from absorbing parts of food that are important for staying healthy. The damage is due to a reaction to eating gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and possibly oats.  Really the way I understand it, it’s very much like diabetes, where it is all revolving around our immune system.  For more indepth info – you can check out The Canadian Celiac Disease website http://www.celiac.ca/index.php

Some of the symptoms are:

- Abdominal pain, bloating, gas, or indigestion
- Constipation
- Decreased appetite (though it can be increased or remain same)
- Diarrhoea, either constant or off and on
- Lactose intolerance (common when the person is diagnosed, usually goes away after treatment)
- Nausea and vomiting
- Stools that float, are foul smelling, bloody, or “fatty”
- Unexplained weight loss (although people can be overweight or of
- normal weight)

 

A video from JDRFUK explains how T1* and celiac are very closely related and if you take the time to watch it – you will learn quite abit (it’s 17 minutes in length).  In the UK I found out from a Mum whose diabetic daughter has coeliac disease, that a  simple blood screening test is done most of the time for children when they are diagnosed with diabetes (though according to the video link above – it’s still abit of a controversy as to whether it should be done for EVERY newly diagnosed diabetic patient).  I am not sure if the same applies in the United States – but my understanding from a few teens I met up with in July said that it is done all the time.   I know that here in my province of Quebec (Canada) – according to Marco Bianchi from the Montreal Children’s Hospital that “we only screen for celiac if there is a presence of clinical evidence”.  It is perhaps different in other provinces of Canada and the world. So would love to hear from anyone that has more knowledge then I do.

From what I’ve been hearing through the grapevine, the way that wheat is now grown is perhaps the problem that is causing the increase in celiac diagnosis.  It is no longer “pure” – due to what is added in the growth stage of the wheat, and then when made into a product that is sold on our grocery shelves – is further compromised.

I heard from one person that says that since making their own bread at home, using a sour dough recipe, that they do not have any problems associated with celiac.  Now, I’m not sure if perhaps they are using wheat that is grown from old stock seeds (this is now being done – as it appears that old seeds that have not been “modified” seem to not cause any problems … yet).

I know that some of the Canadian magazines I subscribe to seem to be posting more gluten free recipes this year (Chatelaine is one such as this gluten-free pizza dough recipe).  I have also come across some restaurants in my travels that offer gluten free meals – but it is still a big worry for those that have celiac disease – where you can’t be exactly sure if the food you are eating has come in contact with any gluten product like you would with preparing your own food at home.  Perhaps more chain restaurants will show on their menu a product that is gluten free, besides just catering to those who are watching their carb intake, etc.

*Also, from the research I did for this blog, apparently people who are not diabetic but have celiac disease are prone to becoming diabetic (Type 1 or 2),  or have thyroid disease, and other health problems.  Often lactose intolerance is present as well – but often disappears once a gluten-free diet is followed (results take about 2-3 months for improvement).

Additional website you might want to check out - explaining how Celiac disease affects children / adults can be found here . Remember, these sites are valuable for information that you can bring to your own health care provider - do not always rely on the sources that you read online!

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