Blog Entries With Tag: high


Posted: Sep 29, 2013
                            Ahhh the fashions in 1970

How many of us have been designated drivers?  As a diabetic, amongst my friends when I was younger, I would normally be the one a) that had a car (and could afford the gas/insurance); and/or b) didn’t drink to the point of total obliteration of the mind.  So, after having a good time, piling into the car to head back home (for more partying sometimes) – I would make sure that my friends were okay  - glass of water – few aspirins – then be on my way home if I wasn’t staying the night.

Sigh, the responsibilities of being a diabetic when your friends aren’t (I think we younger diagnosed diabetics have to grow up faster sometimes than our nondiabetic mates).  To some of you, it may seem like we miss out on all the fun – but in away – I never felt I did (well – hey I did indulge from time to time –I mean I’m no saint).  The main thing, I could remember EVERYTHING the next day, they couldn’t, and the stories I could relay to their kids today would be such a hoot - but I won't - don't worry.

The other day, a friend of mine, who immigrated to Quebec about 10 years ago, that I’ve known since the age of 7, called me up, inviting me over for coffee and cake (ohhh homemade cake .. NOT - they don't like to cook <lol>).  I actually hear and see less of them than when we lived further apart.  Their life is complicated (whose lie isn't?) – and boy oh boy – that could make for a whole other blog – but that’s their story to tell if they can write honestly.

At the time, I knew I had 4 units of insulin remaining in George Michael (my Animas 2020 insulin pump –still going strong into his 2nd year of being out of warranty – hope I don’t jinx him here by saying that).  I figured that I’d be okay – my BG (blood glucose/sugar) was acting stable that day (5.1 mmol/l – 92 mg/dl) – so I knew I’d not need to correct with multitudes of insulin if I went high – even with coffee and cake.

I stayed for an hour – chatting up on what had been happening in their life over the last 3 months (boy oh boy – what a soap opera).  Then Monsieur George went into ALARM mode – FEED ME NOW!!   No biggie, and I guess for some of you reading this, you’re thinking “why didn’t she bring back up? She preaches this to all of us!!”.  Well, I forgot, plain and simple.  I also knew, that going without insulin for less than an hour would not be the death of me (not like my DKA experience back in August – 6 hours without insulin – NOT GOOD).

So as I attempted to leave (hey –they like to talk – yap yap yappity yap) – my friend was reminiscing about the times I had been low (Hypoglycemia / low blood glucose).  If I could have captured the look on their face – of how I looked to them when I was “drunk” with a low – PRICELESS.  It was something that I forgot about – that they’d probably seen me that way many times over the past 45+ years – and it was actually kind of neat that they would remember those details – and I was seeing how I looked in their eyes. 

They work for a dentist – who is a Type 1 diabetic.  They told me that they had asked their boss – incase the he went low – where did they kept their insulin, etc.  The dentist was reluctant at first to tell them where it was kept in his office but in the end told them. That’s when my brakes came to an abrupt screech – and I said. 
Car braking hard 
“ You would have given them insulin when they’re low?  That’s the last thing you should be doing – they will go even lower!!! "

It actually freaked me that my friend, who is a Dental Assistant, who has known me for so long, would consider giving insulin to someone in that state - and would they know how to test their BG properly to access the situation?

I once again put on my “educators” cap like I seem to be doing alot lately when I'm out on the town – hoping that the simple explanation I gave to them, will ensure that any diabetic that they come across in future, that either may be going low or high (Hyperglycemia / high blood glucose/sugar).  I’m hoping it retains in their noggin’ – because obviously knowing me for so long – they still don’t get it (like my Mum who thinks apple juice is sugar free).

It also proves to me – why many of us are so anal about our control – and taking care of ourselves – rather than others (even “trained” nurses in a hospital – and I speak from experience).  We know what works best for us – and hope that we don’t get into the situation where we need someone to assist us – without full knowledge of what to do.

NB:  When I got back home after picking up a few groceries along the way - I was reading 8.1 mmol/l - l46 mg/dl.  Infusion change - fresh juice of life in my pump - back to regular programming!

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Posted: May 4, 2013

Emmy Black who runs the Canadian Sugar (Diabetes) group on Facebook announced earlier in the week that the Marilyn Denis Show a Canadian daytime talk show had a story on a Type 1 diabetic (T1D) girl and her family – along with their new family member, a medical assistance dog who who can detect highs and lows as far as … and get this … UP TO FIVE MILES AWAY!!!

What was really good about this segment was not just the story about the dog who came all the way from Orange, Virginia but how both Avery, 8 and her parents, Jennifer and Steve described how living with diabetes has affected their family since her diagnosis at the age of 4.  The loss of sleep, nighttime blood tests (I can see some of you nodding your heads who do this), the change of eating (healthy – sometimes more expensive), costs that are not covered by the province of Ontario they live in (high sugar foods for low blood sugars for one).  Luckily, in Ontario, that province - has a pump program for ALL age groups – unlike some of our other Canadians provinces that either do have a program but for only under 18 or none at all).   
Now, the dog doesn’t go to school with Avery (she is on an insulin pump), but with the family living about a mile away from school, he knows what is going on with her blood sugars.   His senses are that AWARE, and proved it a few weeks ago when he actually detected Avery was going low by barking and crying at home.   The parents called up Avery’s school to tell them that she was going low.  Now, is that amazing or what!!!

In the 10 minute segment that you can watch in this link  – in a nutshell – the information that was revealed this week on this show will hopefully make those folks who don’t understand the complexities of diabetes not just in children, but also in those of us who have grown up to be adults, to better understand what diabetes is all about.  Maybe I should tell my neighbour I blogged about yesterday to watch this segment! LOL

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Posted: Jun 3, 2012


I've been undergoing physio for a tennis elbow problem (see earlier blog at this link).  Well, that all ended this past Friday - since the anti-inflammatory medication I was prescribed by a walk in clinic doctor seem to be doing the job (if not - I have to wait for an appointment in August for a cortizone shot - which I'd like to avoid if I can).  I'll still have to keep up with the exercises that my physio therapist had given to me - to strengthen up the muscles in the elbow area - but for now - I can type away much longer (and I'm not wearing the tension elbow band - since I left it at the sailboat last week - oops).  The main thing - I have my work station set up - so that is one step in the right direction.


I had asked the prescribing doctor at the time if the medication she prescribed would affect my blood sugars - and she said it wouldn't.  I must have been doubting this doctor in my mind since I asked the same question to the pharmacist when I picked up the prescription.  They said the same thing.

Well, THEY ARE WRONG!!!  My blood sugars since starting on them have been more wild then the craziest roller coaster ride I've been on.  I am unable to get my blood sugars to my happy zone - so riding in the 180 - 250 range - even with corrections via syringe - increasing basal rate.  I was not a happy camper - if you follow me in Twitter or Facebook - you would have seen my meows of frustration.

Today, I was in a discussion on one of the diabetic groups I follow on Facebook for insulin pumpers - and a gal was having problems with her own BG's (maybe due to an infection we think - but not certain).  I told the group of my problems lately - and found out that anti-inflammatory I'm taking is a steriod  and these WILL alter your blood sugars ((though the website for what I'm taking doesn't seem to mention this).  Also, a pharmacist friend (also a T1D and having probs with her own blood sugars) had mentioned that even if what I'm taking is NSAID, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, we all differ in how we react to medications we take.  Another point she made, which makes sense, it could be from the cortisol release from the pain or inflammation I'm taking and not directly related to the medication. All good points to consider, and great to have a medically trained member on some of the groups I belong to!

One fellow mentioned that I should up my basal rate on my insulin pump by 30% while I was taking these meds.  So, off I went since 10% isn't working for me, changed my settings on Michael George and he started alarming. WTF?  He was only set for no more then 1 unit of insulin per hour for my Maximum basal rate - so he was alarming that he  would not deliver due to my settings.  I've never had this type of warning before - so learned something new today. I also had to change the Total Daily Dose (TDD) setting so George is permitted - otherwise he'll alarm again.  Now you can see, that we humans still rule what our pumps do for us, without our permission to override the program we've set up for them - they will alarm, and alarm, until you follow the simple procedures to change your settings.  There are alot of safety factors in operating and using an insulin pump - to protect the user.

I have to admit.  Since I had DKA as a teenager in the 80's - I don't think I've ever used this much insulin before.  I'm not sure if it's also to do with the weight gain from menopause - but feel probably the hormonal issue is what is adding to my blood sugars going wacky.

All I know is, hopefully I will be able to eat my meals abit better now.  I mean, why shove food into my body, when my blood sugars are so high?  Food only contributes to make my blood sugars wacky!!  I know, I know, we need some sort of energy food, so I'm doing my best, but very difficult especially when I have to eat in order to take the anti-inflammatory medication since you can't take these pills without food - or nasty tummy problems occur.

Ahhh - the life as a diabetic on a roller coaster ride - sometimes it's not all fun and games - but we survive - especially when we've got mates out their in the D-OC (diabetic online community) that come to your rescue with advise when you need it!
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Posted: May 12, 2011


Well, while having to cope with lack of energy due to this viral pneumonia – I missed out on being involved in Wednesday’s “D-bloopers” (my brain couldn’t really think of which blooper to tell about – too many over the past 40+ years).  So, while I have some renewed energy, here I go with today’s topic of discussion.  Can’t wait to read what others have to say – check it out them out at this link .

1)      How when I drink water – that it squirts out the end of my fingers due to multiple vampire pricks over the past 30+ years of blood testing.  I am like a fountain.

2)      Wondering if I’ll wake up in the morning with a good blood sugar (5-7 mmol/l) or bad blood sugar (over 10 mmol/l).  I’m anal about my blood sugars aren’t I?

3)      Wondering what it’s like to be not be a diabetic  – would it be any different then my life today as I play a game of poker at the casino each week?

4)      Depression goes along with diabetes (am going through this at present – not fun at all).

5)      Losing my eyesight – I wouldn’t be able to watch Glee or see Sprinkles the Diabetes Advocacy Unicorn!

6)      How I wish my significant other could understand how diabetes affects me even after almost quarter of a century of ball and chain with him - he still doesn’t know when I’m low!

7)      That diabetes is increasing in the our big blue marble population – according to WHO – 220 million people around the world have diabetes .

8)      What diabetic doesn’t dream of eating without having to think about blood sugar control and all the other crap we have to worry about?  I mean – imagine pigging out on bacon? (this one is for you George).

9)      Low blood sugars – I can function even at 2.0 mmol/l – but it’s not good at all for any of us diabetics to go low like this (does it kill off brain cells I wonder?).

10)      Other diabetics who ask for my advise – then tell me – they don’t have time to do what I do – they are too busy with work, etc.  Meanwhile they are having eyesight problems, not able to feel things properly with their fingers , etc.   It saddens me to no end (I couldn’t be a doctor – I think I’d have a nervous breakdown with patients like that).

 

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From:

Posted: Feb 2, 2010

Finding and treating diabetes early can prevent health problems later on. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms and do not know they have diabetes. Some people are at higher risk for diabetes than others. People at high risk include those who:

  • are older than 45
  • are overweight
  • have a close family member such as a parent, a brother, or a sister who has or had diabetes
  • had diabetes during pregnancy
  • had a baby that weight more than 9 pounds
  • are African American, Hispanic or Latino, Asian American or Pacific Islander, or Native American
  • have high blood pressure
  • have high cholesterol or other abnormal blood fats
  • are inactive
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