Blog Entries With Tag: glycemic index


Posted: Jun 26, 2012

Quinua (Quinoa) plants near Cachora, Apurímac, Peru. Altitude: 3800m

(Photograph: Maurice Chédel)

Okay - what’s the big buzz about this grain (don’t ask me how you pronounce it – everyone I talk to about it says it differently ) –  I just think of the name ‘Quinn’ with ‘oa ‘ afterwards – rolls off the tongue nicely)?  Now, did you know it’s actually a seed – and is related to beets (yum), spinach (I’m Popeye the Sailor Man – flexing my muscles here), and …. tumbleweed (where’s my Trigger and heel spurs – I’m a wanna be Roy Rogers).   The other part of the history of Quinoa (Quinua in Spanish) is that when the European conquest in South America took place, the Inca’s were  banned from growing it because of  its status within indigenous non-Christian ceremonies.  Instead, they were forced to grow wheat!!!    Darn foreigners taking over – well – karma is paying them back as the year 2013 has been declared International Year of Quinoa by the United Nations.

So, history lesson over – what I’ve discovered about quinoa is that not only is it nutrient rich, but also for those of us watching our carb intake and/or spikes in blood sugar (diabetic or not) it's an excellent choice as either a meal in itself or as a side dish.  It’s considered a protein by many articles I’ve come across in my research – and has all the essential amino acids in it which other grains are missing.  Along with that, it’s higher in iron and potassium and is a good source of B vitamins, Omega-3 fatty acids, magnesium, copper, zinc and fiber.

On the weekend at my yacht club I belong to, we had a Pot Luck dinner (it was our Founder's Day - when the idea of the club was formed back on June 24th, 1958).  I always try to bring something different to get folks to try something different – last time I brought some dolmades  (stuffed vine leaves).  They went over alright with the crowd there – bit of hesitation –many jokes about smoking a cigar still rings in my ears (really – they do look like cigars) – but they did get eaten up – though with some hesitation from folks that are your usual meat ‘n potato eaters.  This time, I tried a quinoa salad on them, thinking that it would be picked over and leftovers would remain for my DH and myself to eat on the other 2 days were were staying at our floating cottage (it was a long weekend here in Quebec – gotta make the most of our summer here in the northern climate of Canada).  I placed my usual placard showing what was in the food (I always do this incase of food allergies) – and viola – the bowl was basically licked clean – and I received so many compliments that I told them I’d post the recipe for them.  So my friends at Stormont Yacht club – the little gem along the Saint Lawrence Seaway in Ontario – this recipe is for you!  

 

***** FATCATANNA'S QUINOA SALAD *****

This recipe is a compilation of various recipes I’ve come across – and if you are like me – just wing it – and it’ll always come out great.  The secret to this recipe is to add the quino at the END of the vegetables being thrown in the marinade.  My other suggestion, deseed your tomatoes.  I do this due to folks having problems sometimes with seeds (my Mum has diverticulitis ).  I also do this more for how the final product looks and makes the salad less “mushy”.  Again, it’s up to you, and whatever way you do it – let us know how it turns out!  

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1 pinch of sea salt
  • ¼ cup olive oil (I just blop it in – so is probably more)
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • Freshly ground pepper (use whatever amount you like)
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • ¼ cup lemon Juice (I love lemons – so I tend to put in abit more)
  • 3 tomatoes, diced (again – I deseed mine – you can use more if you wish)
  • 1 cucumber, diced (I used Lebanese cucumbers due to low seed count – I yield about 1 ½ cups – but again – you can use more or less depending on what you like).
  • 2 carrots, grated (about 1 ½ cups – it’s up to you the chef!!!)
  • 2 bunches green onions, diced (I use more, and actually tried out purple onions in my latest recipe
  • 1 cup or more of coriander chopped (or you can use parsley – whatever you have in your garden or on hand in the fridge)
  • ¼ cup of fresh mint chopped (if you don’t like mint – don’t use it – it was in the version I made for SYC)
  • 300 grams of feta cheese, crumbled in with fingers (you can use more if you wish – I usually do).

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a saucepan, bring water to boil.  Add quinoa (see note below) and a pinch of sea salt. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes (or until liquid is mainly all absorbed).  Allow to cool to room temperature; fluff with a fork.
  2. While the quinoa is cooking, in a large bowl (and I mean large since I like to toss my salad around so it gets good coverage), combine olive oil, sea salt, pepper, garlic, lemon juice, tomatoes, cucumber, green onions, carrots, coriander (or parsley), mint, feta.  Stir in cooled quinoa.

OPTIONAL:

To increase the protein to make the salad a main meal – I’ve thrown in black beans – about a cup and a bit to the salad. Again, use your imagination, and whatever you have on hand in your fridge!

NOTE:  As one reader pointed out (thanks Moggy B - my "step sister") - some people find quinoa has a bitter aftertaste.  To avoid this, simply rinse the qwuinoa in a fine mesh strainer - then add it to the boiling water at that point.  I know for myself - I don't rinse it - but it depends on how sensitive your taste buds are.  Also, to check out the full nutritional facts - click on this link - very VERY informative website! 

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From: ppatel24

Posted: Jun 15, 2011
Generally, doctors advise patients of Type II diabetes to stay away from sugars. However, there is a sweet product that can be used to treat diabetics instead of harming them. This is special sweetener is Honey! Honey has the least impact on blood sugar from all the sweeteners. An hour to an hour and half after honey consumption, blood sugar level result lower as much as by 60 to 100mg/dl.  Natural honey has a glycemic index (GI) of 30.  The low GI portrays that the carbohydrates in honey break down gradually and therefore releases glucose slower. On the other hand, processed honey has a glycemic index of 75, which means that the carbohydrates break down quicker during digestion and release glucose rapidly.
Honey also lowers glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which is a type of hemoglobin measured to identify the average plasma glucose concentration. The normal range of the HbA1c test in people without diabetes is between 4% and 6%. People with diabetes have a goal of keeping their HbA1c test score lower than 7%. HbA1c levels can decrease to about 2-4% after honey is consumed. In January 2008, the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center stated that honey improves blood sugar control and insulin sensitivity compared to other sweeteners.
How much honey can be consumed on a daily basis by diabetics? About three to five tablespoons a day is recommended. The percentage of total calories provided by sugars should not exceed 10%. Since one tablespoon of honey contains 60 calories, one would be gaining 180 to 360 calories a day from honey, which is sufficient. Therefore, replacing sugars with honey in the diet should be the first treatment advised to Type II diabetics.
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Blog: WIDA

Posted: Feb 2, 2010

A rich, healthy breakfast is important for a good start of the day

The Canadian Diabetes Association guidelines suggests a blood glucose of 10.0 mmol/L (180 mg/dl) or less 2 hours after a meal (this target should be 8.0 mmol/L or less if you are not reaching your A1C target of 7.0 or less). Reaching this target after breakfast may be difficult because often this meal contains food with a high glycemic index. Examples of high glycemic index foods are: white bread, white bagel, Cheerios, Corn Flakes, Rice Krispies. Alternative low glycemic index choices would be 100% stone ground whole wheat bread, heavy mixed grain bread, pumpernickel, All BranTM, Bran Buds with PsylliumTM and Oat BranTM. More information about glycemic index and reference charts are found at http://www.carbs-information.com/glycemic-index.htm.

It is important to make sure that your breakfast is balanced and contains some protein and (good) fat to help slow down the absorption of the carbs and provide proper nutrition. Some suggestions are low fat yogurt, peanut butter, almonds, egg and cheese. For more information consult your dietitian.

Some authorities are suggesting to bolus about 20-25 minutes before eating breakfast as this would give the rapid acting insulin some time to start acting as blood glucose rises from these easily digested carbs. 

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Posted: Jan 20, 2009

I have to admit, I have been listening/watching lots of “stuff” about today’s inaugural events.  The other day I saw the chef chosen for the inaugural luncheon interviewed on television. 

 

Nice chap.  However, as a diabetic I was listening to the ingredients used in preparing the dinner.  Yes, I realize President Obama is not a diabetic.  However, my blood sugar skyrocketed just listening.  There was virtually nothing that did not have some extra form of sugar piled on or in it.  It was hardly a low glycemic index meal much less a low carb meal!  The redeeming feature, I suppose, was the vegetable medley – at least there was something green.

 

The menu consisted of:

 

·        Seafood stew with a puffed pastry top

·        Duck with cherry chutney/pheasant with wild rice stuffing

·        Molasses whipped sweet potato

·        Winter vegetables (asparagus, carrots, brussel sprouts and wax beans)

·        Cinnamon apple sponge cake and sweet cream glaze

 

There were carbs, carbs and more carbs.  I do not think I ever eat that much food or that many carbs in a two-day period, much less in one luncheon.  Consider the flour for the rue and the puffed pastry on the stew, the cherry chutney, the wild rice, and the molasses and sweet potato.  I will give the chef leeway on the dessert … they are supposed to be sugar laden.

 

I guess it is a good thing I am not a Washington insider.  I would have been very hungry since I could not even have eaten the protein (covered in cherry chutney).  However, considering the obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemics, could the crew who chose the luncheon menu and ingredients think about the sugar/carbohydrate quantity for a minute or two?  There were 200 invited guests.  I guarantee some of them are diabetics and not necessarily insulin dependent (to “cover” the carbs).  It is an epidemic after all; Washington cannot possibly be immune to the event. 

 

I also guarantee most people would never say anything or ask if there is an alternative.  People tend to get embarrassed in their own families (much less a State event) and either eat all the sugar laden food or skip the meal entirely.  In either case, there are consequences to pay, minimally, for the rest of the day.

 

I also know some people still maintain diabetics can eat anything as long as they count carbs and inject insulin.  I do not believe that.  The timing never works.  There is always a low and a high or both.  The Russian roulette game of large volumes of insulin is just too difficult.

 

In addition, many do not attempt to maintain a tight glucose level so they may not care about their blood sugar as I do.  Many just say, “It is only one day.”  That has just never been my philosophy.  That is not to say I am a “miss good two shoes,” it is just that I have paid the price in earlier years and I am not willing to pay the price any longer.  The advent of glucose monitors provides some sort of “in your face” reminder of the consequences.

Therefore, I ask the new administration and their chefs to please be more cognizant of the example being set in the White House.  If we, as a country, are going to put a stop to the obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemics, it cannot be a bottom up event.  It needs to start at the top.  Please … less sugar clad foods, fewer carbs, more healthy and heavens, smaller meals!

 

Doris J. Dickson

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