Blog Entries With Tag: diet


Posted: May 17, 2012
Whenever we'd go on a road trip - my Mum would always pack snacks - not just for me because of my having diabetes - but for all of us.  Often it saved stopping off - wasting time to get to our final destination (usually to the coast for a holiday).  Also, it saved money by not stopping off at a restaurant.  Eating a road side park was always abit of fun - to run around - let some steam off (so my brother wouldn't contemplate more ways to kill me in the back seat of the car as I kept on bugging him - I mean what are siblings for?).

I've always carried on that tradition (not bugging my passenger(s)) - when we go on a road / air trip - I pack our own food (with air travel I'm abit limited - but still do it - food at the airport is tres cher).  When it comes to a road trip tho' - it's a great time to fill up bags with nibbles that I don't usually keep at home - you know - for those boring highway periods - and you get that snack attack (provided that your BG's are in a good zone - since sometimes being inactive can make my BG go up abit).

So, I'm heading off to Boston for the Canadian long w/e with my DH - and one of my treats I've just bagged up - is 15 gram of pure carb delight - Garden Veggie Straws.  I'll also cut up some healthy veggies - diced up cheese - and a few cans of diet pop.  Oh and who can forget the "sweets" for the road trip!  My fav are sour lemon drops made by Sorbee - only 3 of them have 15 grams of carbs (about 50% of what regular sugar candies have).  Now of course, this doesn't mean I'll be sucking on these sugar free candies every nanosecond.  You have to remember - sugar free does not mean - CALORIE FREE - it all adds up in the end!

What nibbles do you like to pack for the road trip?  I'm curious to know what teases your pallet when you're winding through country roads to your destination!


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Posted: Oct 13, 2011

UPDATE:  Here's a recent  link that might help you understand this condition that affects Type 1 diabetics - https://www.verywell.com/the-gluten-free-diabetes-diet-562996 - but please feel free to carry on reading below - and pass on this information to anyone you think might find it useful!

FatCatAnna June 2, 2017

* * * * *

Lately I’ve been noticing that quite a few diabetics I meet (mainly young ones) have been diagnosed with celiac (or coeliac) disease.  What is it?  It’s a condition that damages the lining of the small intestine and prevents it from absorbing parts of food that are important for staying healthy. The damage is due to a reaction to eating gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and possibly oats.  Really the way I understand it, it’s very much like diabetes, where it is all revolving around our immune system.  For more indepth info – you can check out The Canadian Celiac Disease website http://www.celiac.ca/index.php

Some of the symptoms are:

- Abdominal pain, bloating, gas, or indigestion
- Constipation
- Decreased appetite (though it can be increased or remain same)
- Diarrhoea, either constant or off and on
- Lactose intolerance (common when the person is diagnosed, usually goes away after treatment)
- Nausea and vomiting
- Stools that float, are foul smelling, bloody, or “fatty”
- Unexplained weight loss (although people can be overweight or of
- normal weight)

 

A video from JDRFUK explains how T1* and celiac are very closely related and if you take the time to watch it – you will learn quite abit (it’s 17 minutes in length).  In the UK I found out from a Mum whose diabetic daughter has coeliac disease, that a  simple blood screening test is done most of the time for children when they are diagnosed with diabetes (though according to the video link above – it’s still abit of a controversy as to whether it should be done for EVERY newly diagnosed diabetic patient).  I am not sure if the same applies in the United States – but my understanding from a few teens I met up with in July said that it is done all the time.   I know that here in my province of Quebec (Canada) – according to Marco Bianchi from the Montreal Children’s Hospital that “we only screen for celiac if there is a presence of clinical evidence”.  It is perhaps different in other provinces of Canada and the world. So would love to hear from anyone that has more knowledge then I do.

From what I’ve been hearing through the grapevine, the way that wheat is now grown is perhaps the problem that is causing the increase in celiac diagnosis.  It is no longer “pure” – due to what is added in the growth stage of the wheat, and then when made into a product that is sold on our grocery shelves – is further compromised.

I heard from one person that says that since making their own bread at home, using a sour dough recipe, that they do not have any problems associated with celiac.  Now, I’m not sure if perhaps they are using wheat that is grown from old stock seeds (this is now being done – as it appears that old seeds that have not been “modified” seem to not cause any problems … yet).

I know that some of the Canadian magazines I subscribe to seem to be posting more gluten free recipes this year (Chatelaine is one such as this gluten-free pizza dough recipe).  I have also come across some restaurants in my travels that offer gluten free meals – but it is still a big worry for those that have celiac disease – where you can’t be exactly sure if the food you are eating has come in contact with any gluten product like you would with preparing your own food at home.  Perhaps more chain restaurants will show on their menu a product that is gluten free, besides just catering to those who are watching their carb intake, etc.

*Also, from the research I did for this blog, apparently people who are not diabetic but have celiac disease are prone to becoming diabetic (Type 1 or 2),  or have thyroid disease, and other health problems.  Often lactose intolerance is present as well – but often disappears once a gluten-free diet is followed (results take about 2-3 months for improvement).

Additional website you might want to check out - explaining how Celiac disease affects children / adults can be found here . Remember, these sites are valuable for information that you can bring to your own health care provider - do not always rely on the sources that you read online!

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Posted: Jun 23, 2011

Wow! It's amazing going over stuff that I forgot I still had.  Because of having moved around - I only had so much room that I could keep of childhood memories.  Those memories are all stuffed into a box that normally you would buy paper for your office printer. It contains the first 20 years of my life that I was able to save before my parents could put it in the trash (they aren't professional pack rats like me)!

I have only started looking at few items, but I was curious to see what my diary that I had at the age of 11 contained.  I thought that there might be more mentioned about my diabetes, but there is very little in there, except for a few scribbles about my 2nd year at Camp Banting when I was 11 near the end of the small notebook (6" length x 4" width).  I was amazed to see that I actually was missing my parents (don't think they were) and the fact that we weren't allowed to make calls home (I can't see that happening today at a camp grounds).  I mentioned about having to have my diet changed four times, probably due to my being more active is the only reason for that.  Oh and my loving the orange cookies we got once in awhile for snacks (we had more the year before at camp I wrote).  There was one mention of a fellow cabin mate having a bad hypo and all of us running to get 4 camp counsellors at 2:00 a.m. to help her (obviously none of us 11 year olds had Life Savers or orange juice in our cabin - nowadays I think we would have those with us).  Near the end I wrote, I was getting bored of camp, and never wanting to go back again (but I later corrected that entry in red - that it wasn't so bad ).   

What surprised me even more - was that not only had I been to diabetic camp that year for 2 weeks - but a month prior - a 2 week ocean holiday with my family in Maine (which I loved so much according to my scribbles).  I didn't realise that I had two holidays in one summer that year - boy oh boy - was I spoiled - since CDA camp was not cheap in those days to attend.

So, below is a picture of me that I found wedged in my diary - standing outside a little place we always would stop off at on our 8 hour road trip from Ottawa to Higgins Beach, Maine.  The Farmer's Daughter Gift Barn on Route 2 in St. Johnsbury, VT - chock full of great stuff to amaze your friends with - and always a place to stretch your legs abit.



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Posted: Jun 11, 2010

Recently I’ve been following Ginger Vieira on Twitter.  Originally it was due to the fact we live within a few hours of each other, and she’d commented about the upcoming Montreal Jazz Festival that I'd tweeted about.  From there, we connected, and I discovered that she’s not only a Type 1 diabetic like me, but also a power lifter and competed in a few national competitions over the years.  Imagine, dead lifting 315 lbs, squatted 265 lbs, and bench-pressing 187 lbs! Serious training and commitment needed for that!  Not only does she deal with diabetes, but also with Celiac disease , which means she has to eat a gluten-free diet.  Not easy in today’s world of over processed foods!

What is even better, is she is like myself, on MDI (multiple dosage injections) and managing very well with all the exercise she does (I feel lazy compared to what her daily work outs are).  She used to be on an insulin pump for 6 years, but after experiencing DKA (diabetic coma due to high blood sugars) – she decided to go back to daily injections – and so far – she has much better control.  Like she says, “

She started a mission a few weeks ago to lose 10 pounds by August 15th – you can find her blog here.  She put out a call to others to join her and a few of us have – among those are Sarah at Sarah Loses It, as well as Cherise aka Diabetic_Iz_Me who posts once in awhile here at Diabetes1.org and at Diabetes Daily.  We all have goals to lose weight and have better control of our diabetes.  Mine is to gain more muscle, which in the end will mean better insulin absorption and hopefully more level blood sugars (BG's).  Not sure if I can lose 10 lbs in such a short time, but I’ll be happy with whatever I can lose (remember muscle weighs more then fat).  It'll just be nice to do it with others that are trying to accomplish similar goals!

So far for myself – I started on Monday, June 7th – my initial weigh in is 152 lb / 69 kg and I’m trying to do at least 30 minutes of exercise every day.  I try to aim to exercise with BG’s in the 100-200 mg/dl or 5.5-11 mmol/l.  Lately I’ve been fighting with BG’s in the a.m. of under 100 mg/dl / 5.5 mmol/l – when I have time to exercise.  I’ve managed to tweak my p.m. dose of Levemir to where I’ve woken up to good BG’s – so able to get in some cycling.  My food intake hasn’t really changed from before.  I try to eat no more then 120 grams of carb a day.  Due to another gum surgery, and being “forced” onto antibiotics, my appetite isn’t the greatest.  Main thing, I’m trying! I’ll be try to report back on a weekly basis each Monday with updates on how I’m doing.

So, anyone else wanting to join us?  Come on Summer Days are coming!!!

 

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Posted: May 13, 2010

To carb or not to carb – that is the question:

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The ups and downs of blood sugar fortune

Or to take arms against a sea of cheese sauce on broccoli ...


Broccoli with cheese sauce


I feel like I’m in London at the Globe Theatre getting ready to watch Hamlet holding a high carb banana in one hand and a cheese curd in the other.  What fate befalls us as we contemplate their destinies!

When I was younger, my Mum followed the Canadian Diabetes Association way of eating (aka American Diabetes Association).   It was what all diabetics followed, and as a child, full of energy I had no problems with the diet which was maybe higher in carbs then what the CDA recommends today.  This is all my Mum had to follow on, since young children with diabetes were a very small percentage of diagnosed diabetics (less then 1%).  She was VERY strict with measuring out my food, no seconds, even if I was hungry, you ate what you had on your plate.  Going to friends house was my way of escaping her careful food planning.  It seemed that my friends had food like there was no tomorrow, but then, none of them had diabetes.  Even worse, going to a birthday party was something that my Mum had I think a hard time dealing with, as there was really no control with what I ate again.  So, birthday parties, sleepovers, didn’t happen too often.  I keep on wondering, if I had been a Mum with a diabetic child like myself, if I would have been the same way, maybe not so much now, but still I can understand her worry. 

When I left home at 19, it was hard to not break the “training” my Mum had taught me, with measuring out food since the age of 7.  Though as most of us know, with time, we eyeball what we are eating, but still, we always are calculating in the back of our minds.  Take for instance the spaghetti (tossed with tomato pesto sauce) that I just had for lunch.  It’s about ¾’s of a cup, so I’m “guesstimating” about 30 grams of carbs.  My blood sugar (BG) at the time was 4.9 mmol/l or 88 mg/dl – so I took a few units of fast acting insulin and hopefully I’ll stay within range.  That’s one thing I miss with my pump holiday – the combo bolus – where you can spread out the insulin coverage.  I’ll probably be checking my BG’s in about 2 hours and a correction may have to be made.  I am a human dart board for the pen needle these days, but it’s okay, 32 gauge needle, way better then needles of the “Stone Age” when I first got diagnosed.

My pasta tossed with tomato/pesto sauce

 So, as you can tell, I love to eat carbs with a limit (though sometimes I go hog wild and don’t feel bad about it as it’s only once in awhile)!  I try not to go over 30 grams of carbs per meal if I can help it.  I do tend to eat smaller portions then what my friends would eat.  I find that this way of eating, to me is subconsciously done (calculate, calculate), is how I have kept my diabetes in control of 43 years.  I’m not sure if a really low crab (LOL on Kerri Morrone Sparling blog post today)  diet would work for me since I do cook a few vegan meals, and of course, beans are high in carbs, so those meals generally are >30 grams or more. 

Off to test my BG's - as I have a feeling the insulin is doing it's job a wee bit too well for what I just ate!  The Roller Coaster Ride of Diabetes - Whoo! Whoo!

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