Blog Entries With Tag: Tudiabetes


Posted: Mar 22, 2012

I met up the other night with a T1D who has had diabetes as long as I have.  She had contacted me through Tudiabetes (and I found out she follows me in Twitter as well).  She wanted information on insulin pumping (she’s still on the wall about being hooked up to a “machine”) and had come to Tudiabetes to find out more and found me there.  I don’t blame her with feeling this way, about going onto a pump, since I was the same when my friend Harold had kept on egging me into trying out a pump, despite my having good results with MDI (Multiple Dosage Injections).  So, I told her to take the plunge, just for the experimental bit (she's got really good work coverage for the pump - that it makes me envious of her).  We’ll see what happens, as it is difficult to break out of your comfort zone after so many years of being MDI (for myself – it was 41 years of MDI – before going onto the pump.  I had never intended to purchase - I was pretty adamant about not being wired up to a pump (and as I told her - now in Canada we have the Omnipod which is a tubeless pump).

What was so amazing is that I have this feeling that folks that have been on the juice of life (aka insulin) for so long - somehow age gracefully.  She looked like she was in her 30's (she had a laugh at this but I’m not lying!!). One thing she taught me, which was new to me, I didn't realise that gastroparesis was part of the neuropathy problem related to diabetes!  She's on the a “semi-Dr. Bernstein diet” - but due to some of the foods you are supposed to eat with his way of eating - they don't sit well with her gastro - but she does try to eat no more than 100 grams of carbohydrates a day. 

The other great thing she showed me was that she is now using the Freestyle InsuLinx blood meter .... that I'd blogged about last year.  There's a few things about it that she doesn't like - and technical support seems abit iffy (it's still new here in North America and even I had trouble getting my questions answered when I was doing research on it for my blog).  I personally found the screen difficult to read when she was showing it to me - and Joan from Cornwall in my blog I wrote - had said the same thing - so hopefully that will be changed over time (e.g. make the screen similar to my Animas pump screen).  Still, it's a great device to use to keep track of your insulin coverage, blood sugars, similar to what a pump does, without the expense OR tubing.

I can’t wait to meet up with her again since I rarely get to meet up with T1D’s in person – especially here in Montreal (remember – T1D’s are only 10% according to word of mouth – as I can’t seem to find any concise statistics – even at WHO website or  NDIC).  

Oh, and because of the way she looks - I today used Equal in my coffee (yes - the chemical stuff that I have for so many years refused to use).  She was quite surprised that I used sugar in my coffee when I met up because she thought I was a good diabetic.  Good?  Moi.  Never - I live on the edge .... in my mind!

So, I’m on a high today (not in the BG (blood sugar) area – woke up to 4.6 mmol/l – 83 mg/dl) after meeting up with my new friend here in Montreal (hoping I did not scare her off with my overzealous ways)!!!

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Tags: gastroparesis (1) BG (1) blood meter (1) Freestyle InsuLinx (1) NDIC (1) WHO (1) Dr. Bernstein (1) insulin (1) MDI (1) insulin pump (1) Omnipod (1) Twitter (1) Tudiabetes (1)
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Posted: Aug 23, 2010

I belong to a few D-OC (diabetic online communites) and one of my first ones I joined up to is Tudiabetes. I have made many friendships with other PWD's (people with diabetes) - and one of those is Danny, who has posted blog here occassionally at Diabetes1.org and recently posted a great discussion about Diabetes Timeline . I'm afraid my contribution is pretty lame, since I have never kept a diary of my years of having diabetes, but some of the other entries are very good and well worth reading.  Take a gander at what I had posted in the discussion - and maybe you'll want to saunter over to Tudiabetes to either join up or if you are a member there - perhaps place you own timeline story.

---------------------------------
This is tough – as I’ve never really kept a written record of my diabetes (have been reading some of yours - and they are so accurate - I feel like such a dumb dumb putting my contribution in here - as it's not very accurate). Anyway, I just had diabetes – and lived with it – and never started to “analyze” it until joining up to the D-OC believe it or not (and any diaries I’ve come across make no mention of diabetes – just usual girl stuff, my gerbils, where to stuff the mess in my bedroom to please my clean freak Mum, etc.).

Girl eating hood by witness4HIM at Photobucket1966-1967 – Age 6 – not well those years – chicken pox – losing weight – bed wetting (made parents VERY angry) – just remember being in the old farts section of hospital (diabetic children were under 1% of diabetic population in those days – much greater now). Spent 2 weeks while they figured out what to give to me. Don’t ask me what my insulin was – something made of oink, oink – I know I used NPH (cloudy insulin). No A1C’s in those days as well.
1968-1971 – Urine testing, being a kid, giving once a day shots. Being a kid.
1972-1974 – I went to Camp Banting – diabetic camp – that was so much fun – did this for 3 years. Wanted to be a camp counselor but that never happened due to my eventually getting 2 part time jobs.
1975 - DKA – coma for 3 days – had been ill for about a year with “flu” - I think that year I was maybe in denial of diabetes, hanging around the Pop Shop (great drinks - SUGAR) - and the Candy Shop (more SUGAR ). Was flubbing urine tests with water at home (duhhhh), doctors knew something was up with blood work when I went to hospital for check up every "x" amount of months ( A1C’s were available then - but due to going to check ups alone I never asked - and if you wonder where my Mum was - she was working - I was left to handle my diabetes daily control since age of 10). Anyway, Mum got into a lot of $#@! for allowing me to be this way – but wasn’t her fault really. She allowed me complete control of my diabetes – I knew I was doing things wrong – case closed. Oh, went back to ER a few weeks after getting out of hospital due to eating a roll of life savers. I really was silly wasn’t I?
1976 – 1979 – High school years – I think I was still on one injection a day – still urine testing. Again, I just did my diabetic thing like a good soldier, did the teenager thing, busy with school/work/partying – just like any other normal kid
1980-1989 – Work / quit job / went back to live in England / worked/drank beer – used glass syringe/needle meant for elephant behind / came back to Canada/ work / partying (got into drugs / alcohol / rock ‘n roll) / used Medi-Injector for awhile – but got fed up with that after awhile. No memory really of what insulin(s) I used, etc. Just did what I had to do to stay alive and kicking. Started to use a HUGE blood meter then (husband remembers this).

Adult woman on motorcycle by Macha5499 at Photobucket

1990 - 2010 – Moved to Montreal – worked / traveled / worked / bought house / settled down / started to take more notice of A1C’s at around 2000 – was usually 7% - which now that I know more about this – wasn’t bad for someone who doesn’t keep a log, etc. Again, don’t ask me which insulin’s I used, maybe HumilinR, I know for sure Lantus, NovoRapid later on. Went onto pump back in 2008 just for the heck of it, after using the poor man’s pump method (MDI). I now am back on MDI – since doing an “experiment” to see if control is as good as pump (lowest A1C I had on pump was 5.6%). Since being on MDI, my A1C has remained at 5.9% - and am happy with it (while doing MDI experiment – have used Levmir – but react in strange way to it which has been reported to NovoNordisk who claim they’ve never heard of this problem) – now back on Lantus / NovoRapid.

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Tags: A1C (2) diabetes (1) timeline (1) camp (1) Medi-Injector (1) sugar (1) Tudiabetes (1) HumilinR (1) pump (1) insulin (1) MDI (1) NPH (1)
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Posted: Jun 2, 2010

I have been diabetic for a few years now.  I think sometimes, how I took care of my myself sometimes was maybe a shot in the dark  – and often look at myself in the mirror thinking … “Wow – you aren’t doing so badly” with the technology that took care of my diabetes from the 60’s and up.   Things are much better now but only if you can find someone who can take the time to go over all the nitty gritty details of how to keep your blood sugars in control, either with pills and/or insulin.  At the same time, we also have to educate ourselves on how to take care of ourselves, but not everyone can do that. I’m telling you it’s a complicated roller coaster ride we diabetics lead sometimes.

 My experiment with going back onto MDI (multiple dosage injecting) has had its ups and downs the past few months if you've been reading my dribbles here.   I’m enjoying the freedom of not being hooked up to a machine, but at the same time, I miss the ease of how I can remedy a situation with a few touches of buttons on my pump and I’m all set.  With MDI, I’m personally finding it a big challenge, to maintain those even BG’s that I can get with my pump basal settings.  I had to give up on the Levemir part of my “experiment” due to reaction to the insulin.  I am now having issues with low blood sugars in the morning.  Trying to figure out what I’m doing wrong – e.g. am I giving my 2 shots of Lantus at the wrong time, am I ???  This is making me seek help from my endocrinologist for the past few days as I deal with waking up to BG’s in the 2-3 mmol/l – 36 – 54 mmol/l.    

This morning I spent some time on the phone with various government services here in my province of Quebec.  First I tried my local health service centre (CLSC), and they had never heard of a CDE (Certified Diabetic Educator).  All they could offer me was a nutritionalist – but when I spoke to her – she didn’t even understand what a CDE was.  She then put me thru’ to Info Sante after we had both done some searches on the Internet together where she said they should be able to help me.  In the end, the Info Sante lady admitted that CDE’s are really a rarity in my province of Quebec (she had never heard of them – but again – perhaps due to my not knowing the French equivalent it didn’t help).  She said my best option was to drive to Cornwall, Ontario – which is a few hours west of my home – and seek help there. 

Just a few minutes ago, I was finally able to reach my endocrinologist’s secretary – and as usual – she’s finding it strange that because I work as a diabetic mentor – I don’t know what to do.  When it comes to pumping, I’m a whiz semi-kid, but MDI, despite doing it for 40 years; I didn’t really understand how insulin worked, etc. before going onto the pump.  She then told me that my endocrinologist has 10,000+ patients – these are open file patients – meaning – he is BUSY - so basically - no time to see me.  These patients are not just diabetics, but other patients with endocrine disorders.  He is overwhelmed.  The fact that she runs the office on her own is another story (I keep on telling them to hire me – but it’s my darn lack of fluent French again).  She also told me, that going to Ontario won’t help, that they have patients coming from that province since there are just not enough endocrinologists to serve them!  Again, CDE’s, why don’t we have them here in this province is what is going thru’ my head which would take the pressure off the endocrinologist? 

She did say that big changes were happening in the Fall time here in the area I live in for a clinic that will be set up just for diabetics (she was vague about what it all entailed).  All I know is, that as a new diabetic, in my situation, I would be very scared, not being able to have some sort of help when I need it.  To be told to go to ER is not something I feel we should do if we are having issues with our insulin regime.  Are Quebec and the rest of Canada ready for the amount of diabetics that are being diagnosed and needing help?  I hate to say this, but I don’t think so. 

Back to research on Lantus again (hopefully Tudiabetes is working again) until I try my endocrinologists office again tomorrow (this is all his assistant could offer me).  Diabetes right now seems to be taking up much of my time lately, as I try to find that magic combination to having level BG’s.   Yes, Dianna, my pump, aka Salvador Dali keeps on looking better and better to me these past few days, but I must resist the pull of his twirly moustache, and hang in until my next A1C in July.  I can do it; I can do it … with a few gripes here and there from the peanut gallery.

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Posted: May 16, 2010

Karen (Bitter-Sweet Diabetes Blog) is the brains behind "Diabetes Blog" week.  I am trying to play catch up because life sometimes grabs me by the pancreas, turns my world upside down and then I lose my thought process.  So, here is the subject for Day 6 of diabetes blog week: 

Inspired by the Diabetes 365 project, lets snap a few d-related pictures to share today. Post as many or as few as you'd like. Be creative! Please feel free to blog your thoughts on or explanations of your pictures. Our leave out the written words and let the pictures speak for themselves. 

 

Diabetes brought many changes in my life. 

 

My first TuDiabetes meet-up

 

site change gone wrong...GUSHER!!!

 

 

 

Be Blessed

Cherise

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Posted: Oct 22, 2009

 

World Diabetes Day Circles

November 14th, 2009 is World Diabetes Day. On that day, at 14:00 hours (2:00 p.m., local time), thousands of people with diabetes will test their blood sugar, do 14 minutes of exercise, test again and share their results online.

The event is called The Big Blue Test because the blue circle is the international symbol for diabetes. The idea of a shared "blood sugar test-in" started with an activity organised back in July 2009 by TuDiabetes.org, a community for people touched by diabetes that I belong to. More than a thousand people participated.  Now, they're hoping  to reach thousands of people with diabetes through various diabetes social networks and Twitter. The activity will incorporate 14 minutes of physical activity to reinforce the importance of exercise.

"People with diabetes have to test their blood sugar routinely. It can be a very lonely activity." said Manny Hernandez, co-founder of TuDiabetes who lives with diabetes himself. "We want people to take The Big Blue Test to shed light on this chronic condition and the importance of exercise on World Diabetes Day."

Currently, more than 250 million people have diabetes worldwide. Millions more have diabetes but do not know it yet.  For those of us in the know, people with diabetes NEED to test their blood sugar levels several times a day and exercise regularly.

Participating in this event to raise diabetes awareness on November 14th is fairly easy:

1.     Test your blood sugar.

2.     Run, jog, walk the dog or do anything you'd normally do as part of your exercise routine for 14    minutes.

3.     Test your blood sugar again.

4.     Go to http://bigbluetest.org (or your preferred diabetes social network) and post your readings and what physical activity you did. If you have a camera, you can also add a photo of your reading(s) or you exercising.

5.     If you have a Twitter account, you can also post your readings on Twitter (use the #bigbluetest hashtag) and link back to http://bigbluetest.org.

"We hope to see most readings posted at 14:00 hours (2:00 p.m.) local time, on November 14th. If you are early or late, it's OK," says Hernandez. "What matters most is that you test your blood sugar often and that you exercise regularly. If you don't have diabetes, you can take The Big Blue Test. Either way, tell others to test, exercise and share on November 14th."

BTW, I'll open up a discussion in the News section of the Forums here at Diabetes1 a few days before hand should you wish to post your readings OR you can go to the following other diabetic networks that you see below.  It really doesn't matter where you post though, just as long as you join in on the celebration of World Diabetes Day by taking part in the The Big Blue Test!  I know I will!

Tudiabetes / Children With Diabetes / Diabetes Daily / Diabetic Connect / Diabetic Rockstar / dLife / Juvenation / Diabetes Central

     
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