Blog Entries With Tag: Medtronic


Posted: Mar 7, 2014

It’s been a month now since coming back to Canada from what I think was the best holiday I’ve had in ages.  I’m still in the process of getting my thoughts together for a good travel blog on the experience along with going thru’ the 1,000’s of pictures both my DH and I took – but in the meantime – it’s back to business for blogging about what I do the best … diabetes … staying in control with it … using whatever method suits you best.

For myself, on this past holiday, I was determined to use the I-Port for all my rapid insulin shots that I take during my waking hours.  I average about 6 shots a day when using my rapid insulin for my meals and corrections.  The ability to not worry about where I last injected (yes – some people keep charts).  I’m lazy – too much work - using the I-Port – which is like an infusion set on an insulin pump (both devices to infuse are very similar) – makes it easier to give time to heal as you move the I-Port/infusion to the next spot.  It makes my life easier!

If I could have put my long lasting insulin into the same port – that would be great – but you can’t – according to the instructions.  It makes sense – since the long lasting insulin (Levemir / Lantus) – work at a different speed – so best to keep them separated.  So, for my regime of using Levemir during my holidays (x3 a day) that was fine (though the 6 AM wake up call for 1st of 3 shots – yawwwnnn – did I say I’m not an early morning riser???).

Anyway, the jist of my blog here is that … I had to ditch using the I-Ports into the 2nd day of our 14 days of sailing.  The reason why?

  • Heavy seas when sailing (we sometimes had waves of 12’ high) – a lot of movement – equals unable to get the needle into the rubber port  that you inject into on the infusion set – tres difficile.   Often I would just inject with pen needle the regular way – and forgo the I-Port altogether.  Sigh.
  • Lack of light.  You need GOOD light to be able to see the rubber port.  A few times when going offshore – the places we were going to – either candle light – flashlight – or next to no light at all.  The life of a boater – lighting is not always what we are used to in our homes that are connected to the grid.

So, I ditched using the I-Ports for the whole 3 weeks of my holidays.

And yes, I am back on the I-Port now back on terra-firma – still enjoying the pump break I’m taking for now.  Testing out Levemir once again – but only on 2X a day injections (sorry Doris - the 3X regime was too much like being a slave to insulin - all I did was worry about times, etc. - not my personal style of controlling my diabetes health - too stressful).

Sadly I only have 6 I-Ports left – and after talks with Diabetes Express / and Fay at Medtronic Canada – who knows when we’ll be able to obtain more.  Discussions are ongoing for distribution since Medtronic took over distribution from Patton Medical Devices in February.  It’s also very sad – when I hear from parents of kids who use the I-Port – and their not being able to get what they need (most kids use 6mm – as an adult – I use the 9mm – otherwise – I’d give the I-Ports to those that need them most).

Feel like discussing this in the forums? You can go check it out here - where I originally posted about the I-Port back in 2008.  It's not new - and many Americans don't know much about it. 

Meanwhile, back to dreaming I’m still living on water ….

Comments | Reddit | del.icio.us | Digg | Stumble | MySpace |
Tags: infusion (1) port (1) insulin (1) Levemir (1) Patton (1) Medtronic (1) Express (1) Diabetes (1)
Add tags:   

Related posts:

Type 1 vs. Type 2  |  In a slump and scared  |  Surviving the Holocaust with Type 1 diabetes  |  Eating from the ground - Yuca Fries  |  My first month with Bowie my Dexcom G4 CGMS  |  Miss Idaho is Defeating Diabetes  |  Sugar and Your Health  |  Crack Free #ShowMeYourPump  |  Edmonton man denied insulin for 20 hours  |  Jenna and The Hypo Fairy
Posted: Dec 13, 2013

Right now it seems that it is just the separate CGMS remote that you find in this link as the Animas insulin pump called the Vibe that you see below - has yet to be approved for use here.  

The good thing?  Once the Vibe is approved (Canada only has the Ping at the moment for sale) - you will be able to use the transmitters without the separate remote (or at least that is what I've read at various places online).

Animas Vibe with Dexcom G4

 

The main thing is - we finally have APPROVAL (an online petition by Nathalia Stanichevsky may have helped push it faster).  For those of us who can afford it (either thru' work insurance coverage) or ability to afford out of pocket.  We are one more step ahead of the game plan.

I had seen it a few years ago at a diabetic conference - and was quite impressed (the excuses given by the rep as to why it was so slow to come to our country made my eyes role as normal - we're a smaller population than USA, the French/English bit, the list goes on).  I even met up with an American that was using it - and she showed how well it worked for her when she was visiting Montreal this summer.  I liked the screen - ease of looking at it - just like the Animas pumps are - compared to the Medtronic that I'd tested out earlier in my pumping years (I'm a late bloomer - starting in 2008 after 40+ years of multiple dosage injections).

The good thing is - now we have two systems  available to us in Canada (the other is Medtronic).  For those of us who are hypo unaware (your blood sugar suddenly drops) or just want to have a better visual of what your blood sugars (BG) are doing - more power to you!

Curently, you have to contact Animas Canada for more info - go to this link to request more info .... http://www.animas.ca/dexcom

Psst, if you find out more info than I'm gathering up at this moment - please let me/us know - either via this post - or privately!

Comments | Reddit | del.icio.us | Digg | Stumble | MySpace |
Tags: transmitter (1) Vibe (1) Medtronic (1) approval (1) Health Canada (1) blood sugar (1) BG (1) CGMS (1) Ping (1) Animas Canada (1) Dexcom G4 (1)
Add tags:   

Related posts:

Keeping track  |  In a slump and scared  |  My first month with Bowie my Dexcom G4 CGMS  |  My 13 year old self describing her DKA in the 70's  |  Twist and Shout – Sleep Apnoea  |  Welcome Ziggy Stardust  |  When You're Hot, You're Hot  |  My First Night with Dexcom G4 CGMS  |  Carb Counting  |  Home Stretch
Posted: Jun 21, 2013

My tummy having a Contact Detach put into it
I noticed in a diabetic group the other day on Facebook - that some people have never heard of the stainless steel infusion sets that some of insulin pumpers use (Medtronic (MM) is a Sure-T, Animas is a Contact Detach, Accu-Chek is a Rapid D).  I know the ones made for Animas and Medtronic – are all made by the same company –
Unomedical.


For some people, giving an injection, with a syringe or pen needle, even with the smaller gauges available AND length of needles, TOTALLY freaks them out.  I can understand with what we had back in the early years of needles meant for elephants buttocks (wait – I was using them on my human buttock as a child – yikeroos).  Times have changed, thank goodness, it's easier to inject, but still some diabetics who have had this disease as long as I have, can’t inject themselves.  Putting a CGMS or infusion set into place on their body - they cannot do. I find with the Contact Detach I have no problems with placing into my skin (it is 29 gauge).  With other infusion sets available, I find the introducer needle that comes with the plastic cannula infusion sets very daunting.  I almost fainted the first time I put one in place, it was sooooo long, compared to the 6mm / 8mm length stain steel needle.


                             Image courtesy of http://www.traveling9to5.com/

To help some of you understand what one of these infusion sets are all about - since some people think the needle portion of the infusion set had to be removed from the skin - here's a great video of a young boy putting in this type of infusion set at this link.  He makes it look so easy (and it is - though watching him made me realise - how long it takes to do this procedure - as it's about 6 minutes from start to finish to perform the task).


Hopefully the video helps explain what a stainless steel infusion set is for some of you who don't know what it is.  Personally, I find it causes less skin irritation for me - as I have a slight Teflon allergy in the plastic cannula's that are used in infusion sets). The other good thing is, it's less expensive to purchase than other infusion sets.  Also, I find due to the connecting port that is on your skin (there is the infusion site AND the connecting port – both glued to your skin) – less chances of ripping off infusion set completely – it’s like a safety chain in a way.  I'd posted about the Contact Detach a few years ago as well - if you want a less model type figure to look at - then you can check out my blog that contains the link.


Contact Detach
The one thing I do have a beef about - and I'd mentioned about this a few weeks ago at Blogger - the cost of the infusion sets to Canadians (and those of us not living in the USA).  The price that we pay for the infusion sets shows quite a wide gap in prices.  For example, my Contact Detach here in Canada costs $155 - if I was an American - I'd be paying $94.  I thought it was perhaps due to our value of our dollar - but we're pretty close to being at par these days.  The price list as well - since I started pumping over 5 years ago - hasn't changed at all.  When I spoke to Animas Canada about the price difference today - Alexis - one of the staff there who took my order (and a pumper herself) - said that due to duty/tarriffs and our smaller pumping compared to the States that this is why we - and other countries pay more.  Huh???? I tried to figure out what the cost was to ship the product from Mexico - to United States - then Canada - but I'd have to have my brain go to school to figure all the ins/outs of trading between these countries through the Canada  Border Service Agency website.
Comments | Reddit | del.icio.us | Digg | Stumble | MySpace |
Tags: Rapid D (1) Sure-T (1) Accu-Chek (1) Medtronic (1) Animas (1) cost (1) United States (1) Mexico (1) Canada Border Service Agency (1) duty (1) tariffs (1) Contact Detach (1) Unomedical (1) insulin (1) pump (1) set (1) infusion (1)
Add tags:   

Related posts:

Type 1 vs. Type 2  |  In a slump and scared  |  Orthopedic Surgery in Mexico - Is it a good idea?  |  Total Knee Replacement Surgery in Mexico  |  Why Mexico Is One Of The Best Destinations For Hip Replacement Surgery ?  |  Surviving the Holocaust with Type 1 diabetes  |  My first month with Bowie my Dexcom G4 CGMS  |  Crack Free #ShowMeYourPump  |  Edmonton man denied insulin for 20 hours  |  Jenna and The Hypo Fairy
Posted: Jun 22, 2011

Okay - don't freak out - I've not suddenly quit my day job to become Uri Geller and perform fork / spoon bending feats - I mean - I'm hoping that this is a one time event - that it does NOT happen again.

Now you are all wonder, what is FatCatAnna on today - has she been smoking something strange - sipping abit of drinky poo - having a low blood sugar?  Well, nope, I am in the right mind at the moment to be able to show you this amazing piece of metal that came out of my body the other day in a bendy shape (I smile as I type this - as my friend Jennie is known as
Bendy-Jen).  Luckily, I had no idea until changing my infusion set which is a 90 Degree 8 mm needle Infusion Set called Contact Detach (or Sure-T for Medtronic pump users).

Amazingly enough, if this had been the usual plastic cannula infusion set that I used to use (I have allergies to the teflon coating in these sets), I would have been having problems with my insulin not pumping properly into my body and abnormal blood sugars.  It had happened once to me with the
Inset II Infusion Set - but thankfully only once.  When that occurred, I didn't realise the cannula had become bent, and my blood sugars went abit wacky near the end and I was having to do needle corrections to stay within the range I like to be.  I only realised when removing the infusion set like I did the other day.

In this case, with what you see below I didn't notice any difference with my blood sugars at all.  Insulin was still managing to go through alright.  The reason this happened though I'm afraid to say, it was not due to my phychic powers .... but because of my anal way of using as much "real estate" on my body.  I actually went abit too far over into the hip area - where I went close to the bone plus I sleep on that side at night so my weight probably added to the bend as well).

We all know that in order to to avoid scar tissue below the surface, which often causes insulin not to be absorbed properly, so rotation and giving that area time to heal is a big thing with for diabetics both on needles and insulin pumps.  I only had scar issues when younger in my buttocks, and taking one needle a day, but in large quantity compared to the small doses I now take.  I also wasn't paying attention then at that age (I was around 12) - to where I was jabbing myself, I just got it over and done with, then off to school I would go. 

So, I now feel for folks that don't have the ample coverage like I do for when they put their infusion sets in place, besides hitting boney parts of their bodies if their not careful, there are also muscles, etc. that can sometimes get nicked.  We diabetics are a tough bunch aren't we?

Due to having to resize for posting at Diabetes1.org picture has become abit blurry - the actual needle portion is not as THICK as what you see here - it is actually 27 gauge thickness - and in real life - more sleek looking!  ***NOTE*** - if you do not see the picture below (Diabetes1.org has been having problems with hackers lately - urrhhh) - please take the extra step (aka click) and go to the pictures that I have posted at the following link - http://www.flickr.com/photos/fatcatanna/sets/72157626907428447/

Comments | Reddit | del.icio.us | Digg | Stumble | MySpace |
Tags: tissue (1) scar (1) teflon (1) bent (1) blood sugar (1) infusion set (1) insulin (1) Medtronic (1) Animas (1) Sure T (1) Contact Detach (1)
Add tags:   

Related posts:

Type 1 vs. Type 2  |  Keeping track  |  In a slump and scared  |  Surviving the Holocaust with Type 1 diabetes  |  My first month with Bowie my Dexcom G4 CGMS  |  My 13 year old self describing her DKA in the 70's  |  Edmonton man denied insulin for 20 hours  |  Twist and Shout – Sleep Apnoea  |  Crack Free #ShowMeYourPump  |  Jenna and The Hypo Fairy
Posted: Aug 29, 2009

Not sure if any of you have checked out the forum area of Diabetes1.org lately - but I posted a discussion about Stephen Krueger - a Canadian - who died 3 years ago after his Medtronic pump (MMT-511) overdosed him with insulin.  When I first came across the story - I was shocked at what had happened - thinking - what if this happened to me - or one of my many friends that wears a pump?  The other thing that went off in my mind was the fact that the story was only coming to light 3 years later after the fact!

The D and his Guy had posted the same story that I had - but with more discussion going on there - and in my quest to figure out how it happened - had put out a few questions to one person that seemed to know more about this terrible tragedy - and it came to light that they were friends of Steven's and his parents. They shared some information that has left me even more stunned - to the point that I didn't sleep very well - as it has disturbed me to no end.

After Health Canada had completed their investigations that the pump was indeed at fault - they proceeded to hand over the pump to Medtronic - so they could also investigate why their pump had performed this act that lead to the death of Steven.  They did not feel that is was important  and send the pump back without any further testing!

One thing I have come across in searching Health Canada  is that in August 2007 - a recall notice was put out on Medtronic insulin pumps - due to strong magnetic field exposure - and I quote -  "If the pump is exposed to strong magnetic fields, it may exhibit over-delivery potentially resulting in severe hypoglcemia. Users muse avoid exposing the pump to stong magnetic fields such as MRI as stated in the labelling." Could Steven's pump been exposed?  I am not sure what he did for a living - but perhaps he was in the medical field.

WTF - if a plane or car had caused something similar - a death - or accident that could not be explained - the manufacturer would no doubt want to do further investigations of what caused it.  Am I being silly in thinking this way? I feel like I'm losing my marbles trying to grasp at why Medtronic isn't going further into the investigation.

The other thing that is going thru' my sponge brain - Steven's pump was 4 years old - according to what I have read.  Meaning it was perhaps nearing the end of it's warranty (I know with my Animas 2020 I have a warranty of 4 years).  I know of some diabetics - who have had their pumps for much longer - and no problems as of yet with how it works - but there is always a chance something might go wrong.  I am thinking perhaps pump manufacturers might want to have their product go thru' a diagnostic check up from time to time perhaps.  Now, yes, it might cost the consumer - but at the price of a pump - it's a small amount compared to what they would pay for a new pump or perhaps have what happened to Steven occur.

Anyway, I am to the point of trying to get a petition together within some of the diabetic communities I am in - to send to Medtronic to ask them why they proceeded this way in not doing further investigations.  At this point in time - I am so glad I did not purchase a Medtronic pump.  One of the reason I didn't at the time (I had test run the MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time System for 4 months prior to trying out the Animas 2020) was due to the the Customer Service which I did not find as good as Animas.

I want to be the Ralph Nader of Diabetics!!!

Comments | Reddit | del.icio.us | Digg | Stumble | MySpace |
Tags: insulin pump (1) MMT-511 (1) Medtronic (1) malfunction (1) Steven Krueger (1) insulin (1) hypo (1) Health Canada (1) Animas (1)
Add tags:   

Related posts:

Type 1 vs. Type 2  |  In a slump and scared  |  Surviving the Holocaust with Type 1 diabetes  |  My first month with Bowie my Dexcom G4 CGMS  |  Miss Idaho is Defeating Diabetes  |  Edmonton man denied insulin for 20 hours  |  Crack Free #ShowMeYourPump  |  Jenna and The Hypo Fairy  |  Welcome Ziggy Stardust  |  Wearing a dress with medical gadgets
Your Diabetes Treatment Plan: Nutrition (Part 1)
Making Healthy Food Choices-Treatment Plan: Nutrition
An introduction to the basics of nutrition for diabetics. Step One: Total ...
more more Featured Videos
Cost Savings Tool
Do you know the annual cost of managing your diabetes? Would you like to find ways to reduce your costs? Calculate your total budget and identify ways to save money. You can do this in just a few minutes by entering facts about the products you use. This quick analysis will provide you with a comprehensive overview of both spending and potential savings.

Cost Savings Tool
Monitor Comparison Tools
Blood glucose monitors offer an easy way to test your blood sugar at home or on the go. Use this comparison tool as a guide to learn more about the features and benefits of your current monitor or to find a new one.
Handheld Monitor Comparison
Continuous Glucose Monitor Comparison
Advanced BMI Calculator
Ever wonder if you are at a healthy weight? Then enter your height and weight in our advanced Body Mass Index (BMI) calculator. This tool provides you with two important numbers reflecting the estimated impact of your present body weight and shape upon your overall health.
Advanced BMI Calculator
more Care Tools
Home | About Us | Press | Make a Suggestion | Content Syndication | Terms of Service | Editorial Policy | Privacy Policy
Last updated: Oct 19, 2019  © 2019 Body1 All rights reserved.