Blog Entries With Tag: GI


From: ppatel24

Posted: Jun 15, 2011
Generally, doctors advise patients of Type II diabetes to stay away from sugars. However, there is a sweet product that can be used to treat diabetics instead of harming them. This is special sweetener is Honey! Honey has the least impact on blood sugar from all the sweeteners. An hour to an hour and half after honey consumption, blood sugar level result lower as much as by 60 to 100mg/dl.  Natural honey has a glycemic index (GI) of 30.  The low GI portrays that the carbohydrates in honey break down gradually and therefore releases glucose slower. On the other hand, processed honey has a glycemic index of 75, which means that the carbohydrates break down quicker during digestion and release glucose rapidly.
Honey also lowers glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which is a type of hemoglobin measured to identify the average plasma glucose concentration. The normal range of the HbA1c test in people without diabetes is between 4% and 6%. People with diabetes have a goal of keeping their HbA1c test score lower than 7%. HbA1c levels can decrease to about 2-4% after honey is consumed. In January 2008, the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center stated that honey improves blood sugar control and insulin sensitivity compared to other sweeteners.
How much honey can be consumed on a daily basis by diabetics? About three to five tablespoons a day is recommended. The percentage of total calories provided by sugars should not exceed 10%. Since one tablespoon of honey contains 60 calories, one would be gaining 180 to 360 calories a day from honey, which is sufficient. Therefore, replacing sugars with honey in the diet should be the first treatment advised to Type II diabetics.
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Blog: WIDA

Posted: Feb 2, 2010

A rich, healthy breakfast is important for a good start of the day

The Canadian Diabetes Association guidelines suggests a blood glucose of 10.0 mmol/L (180 mg/dl) or less 2 hours after a meal (this target should be 8.0 mmol/L or less if you are not reaching your A1C target of 7.0 or less). Reaching this target after breakfast may be difficult because often this meal contains food with a high glycemic index. Examples of high glycemic index foods are: white bread, white bagel, Cheerios, Corn Flakes, Rice Krispies. Alternative low glycemic index choices would be 100% stone ground whole wheat bread, heavy mixed grain bread, pumpernickel, All BranTM, Bran Buds with PsylliumTM and Oat BranTM. More information about glycemic index and reference charts are found at http://www.carbs-information.com/glycemic-index.htm.

It is important to make sure that your breakfast is balanced and contains some protein and (good) fat to help slow down the absorption of the carbs and provide proper nutrition. Some suggestions are low fat yogurt, peanut butter, almonds, egg and cheese. For more information consult your dietitian.

Some authorities are suggesting to bolus about 20-25 minutes before eating breakfast as this would give the rapid acting insulin some time to start acting as blood glucose rises from these easily digested carbs. 

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