Blog Entries With Tag: Diabetescouk


Posted: Mar 30, 2013

Gotta love Mr. Bean

UPDATE -** NOVEMBER 18TH 2013 ** - I HAVE FINALLY BEEN APPROVED TO USE THE I-PORT! Why it took my insurance company so long is beyond my comprehension - but now I'm so excited - especially when I take my next holiday  - where I can't risk having my out of warranty insulin pump go wonky on me - this will make my MDI (multiple dose injection) regime so much easier!!!!

*******************

I posted this blog the other day at Blogger - and thought I'd share it here with you at Diabetes1.org! 

Picture of an upset

Okay, okay, don't get your nose out of joint - my fellow insulin pumping peeps - that I'm saying that the i-port is a mini-me insulin pump - but in away - when you look at it "logically" without any anger from my statement - I AM the "mini-me" pump - I am the brains behind what goes into my body - via the i-port - I AM IN CONTROL - not a machine - that I've programmed with best intentions to keep my diabetes health in control.

 


Yes, I still have to give a separate shot for my "basal" rate with long acting insulin  - I do this twice a day - 12 hours part seems to work best for me.   The basal rate is basically what your pancreas - if it's working - squirts out all the time - in order to keep your blood sugar in a normal range when your not eating, etc.   With diabetes - your pancreas can be abit on the wonky side and either work when it feels like (e.g. Type 2) or like myself as a Type 1 - where my pancreas is dead as a door nail. 


The recommendations of the i-port website is that only ONE type of insulin being put thru' the port via either a pen needle (no shorter than 5mm) or syringe (28 gauge is the thickest - otherwise you could ).  I'm fine with that that I can only use the port for one insulin.  With a "real" insulin pump which has an insulin cartridge that stores insulin (the i-port doesn't - you INJECT the insulin thru' the port) - we all know it's programmed to squirt out ""X amount" of  rapid acting insulin - for your basal rate as well as your bolus rate (aka - if you have to correct a higher than normal blood sugar (BG) or for when you are eating a meal).  If this has got you abit confused about the types of insulin - check out the link from Diabetes.co.uk that explains how injected insulins work in our bodies.  


My messy diary along with box from i-port


The thing I loved about my six day experiment with the i-port (I was only given 2 samples - boo! hoo!) - is that instead of my having to do the human dart board practise on my stomach for my bolus shots 5-8 times a day - I just did my insulin injections through the port in my skin.  It really is like an infusion set that we use with an insulin pump - except it has no tubing - or connections to a little machine that goes ping.   The port is changed EVERY 3 days - which is the recommendation for most infusion sets.  Usually in the past, I've had issues with the teflon coated plastic cannula that remains in my body for that length of time.  Luckily, with the i-port I had no such issues, removing the port left barely a mark in my skin. 


The good thing about the i-port - less expensive then the alternative of an insulin pump (I can purchase the i-ports at Diabetes Express for $149.99 CAD for a box of 10).  This is bit less expensive then what I was paying for my infusion sets with my insulin pump - but the even bigger saving for me?  I'm not having to pay for a pump which ranges from $5-7K depending on where you live - along with the other supplies that go along with the pump (insulin cartridges, batteries, replacement caps, etc.). 


i-port put in place (really easy)


One thing I did find was that I didn't cringe at having to give another shot of rapid insulin for a little sinful snack or a correction shot.  It reminded me so much of the insulin pump I used to use - where a simple touch of the key pad - squirted insulin into my body via the infusion set - except with the i-port - you are the brains behind what insulin you are injecting with.


I have submitted a predetermination form thru' my husbands workplace insurance in the hopes that these ports will be covered - hopefully at 100%.  So wish me luck - since I'm really REALLY missing my little i-port right now - I felt very spoiled using the two I was sent. It's almost how I felt when I first disconnected from my pump - and went back onto multiple daily injection (MDI).  After almost a month of learning how to stay in the BG zone with MDI - I can now say - that ANYONE can do it - if they put their mind to it - and now I'm not missing my pump as I go into my 4th month of being pump free.


It stands out about 1/2" or abit less


My conclusion?  For anyone without insurance coverage - dislikes injecting to the point of not wanting to inject (not good - tisk - tisk - who hasn't done that in their life time with diabetes?) - I really think this is the route to go - to keep a diabetic from suffering the effects of poorly controlled diabetes.  

 


NB
:  The i-port Advance has regulatory clearance in Canada, US and the European Union.  In the EU they currently have distributors in Germany, Italy and the Nordic Region and are in conversations to add some additional countries in the near future. India and Australia will be further down the road. 

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Posted: Sep 29, 2011
This was supposed to go through in the UK back in June 2011 but it was held off until October 1st - which is in a few days.  What is different about the new system? The "old" percentage for our HBA1c values was known as the DCCT (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial) units. Now, the new mmols/mol values will be known as the IFCC (International Federation of Clinical Chemistry) units.

It's recommended that people with diabetes try to keep their HbA1c levels below 48 mmols/mol (under the new units) - which is 6.5%.

So, using the
converter found at Diabetes.co.uk - my 6% HBA1c will now be shown as 42.0767 (see picture below).  When first converting my usual percentage HBA1c I just about flipped at the number - but then realissed - I was okay.

I know with living in Canada, where we went from Imperial measurements to Metric in the 1970's - it's just something we all went along with (not everyone mind you even today). The same would be for me here - if Canada goes this route to IFCC.  Just like when we went from mg/dl to mmol/l (aka the "World" Standard) for our blood glucose monitoring (though still USA and a few other countries still use the mg/dl readings for blood sugar readings).  The good thing out of all of this - I can relate to both and tend to show both units when posting my blood sugars as a courtesy. 

From an online publication by NGSP (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program) that I came across from 2010 - it also states -

"
Officially, there is worldwide consensus that HbA1c should be reported in both NGSP (%) and IFCC (mmol/mol) units along with eAG (in either mmol/L or mg/dL). However, the decision on what to report is actually being made country by country. In the US, reporting NGSP % HbA1c along with eAG has been recommended by the ADA and the AACC. Some other countries have also decided, most will report IFCC and NGSP and some will switch to IFCC only in two years. Although the world will again be reporting different numbers, results will be traceable to IFCC numbers as well as to clinical data through linear equations that are carefully monitored. The ADA, IDF, EASD, and ISPAD as well as other member associations in different countries currently provide patient care guidelines that relate directly to NGSP (DCCT/UKPDS) numbers. These will need to be updated to include both NGSP and IFCC numbers."

If you live in the UK or any other country that is going this route for recording your HBA1c - how do you feel about it?

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