Home
 »  Community
 »  Blogs
 »  Short_Nutra_Sweet
Short & Nutra-Sweet

Short & Nutra-Sweet
By: JWD


<< March 2009 >>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31

 Blog Entries
The Great Debate - Mar 27
The Great Debate that I am referring to is the one about testing and injecting/pumping in public places.  Through the years I have seen various reactions to my ...
more
Cult of Personality - Mar 16
Anna you have set me to thinking about the connection between diabetes and personality.  I would love to hear from other T-1s out there on their views about how diabetes ...
more
Perfectionism - Mar 13
Perfectionism, noun; A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.  American Heritage Dictionary.    ...
more
Spring Fever - Mar 07
March came in like a lamb here in Michigan.  In one day, most of the winter snow is gone.  Yesterday, Friday, the weather was as clear and sunny as the Great Lakes ...
more
A New Study - Mar 05
First I would like to say that I am thrilled with the responses to my entries on this website.  It is so easy to feel alone with Type I.  And yet, there are so ...
more
The Great Debate
Posted: Mar 27, 2009 12:18:19 6 Comments.
  • Report this Post
  • Comment on this Post
  • The Great Debate that I am referring to is the one about testing and injecting/pumping in public places.  Through the years I have seen various reactions to my "public displays of diabetes."  While teaching a health class full of 9Th graders, as I was explaining diabetes and the importance of monitoring blood sugars, I had a student pass out at her desk.  Funny thing is, prior to this experience, it had never crossed my mind that a mere finger stick would cause an adverse reaction in a non-diabetic.  Lesson learned for sure!

    That was back in the early 1980's, since then I either try to be real casual while testing or injecting and try not to bring any attention to myself.  This has worked rather well for me.  I have sat right at the table in a restaurant and taken an injection right through jeans before my companion has time to notice.

    In my mind, I should not have to huddle in a non-sterile environment, such as a stall in the women's rest room, to check my blood sugars or inject insulin.  It has always made me feel dirty and ashamed of not being "whole."  So...I decided that I have a right to take care of my needs without hiding out like a junkie.  If someone is offended, than they have the option to look away, as I do not have the luxury to fore-go my need for administered insulin.  It only takes a few seconds to take care of myself.

    In my small way, I feel I have "normalized" my self-care techniques.  Every once in a while, a friend will share their story about the first time they saw me finger stick and test or inject (in the old days) or pump up the volume on my current insulin pump.  We always end up laughing about their initial discomfort.  They usual tell me that it has helped them to realize what it takes for me to be well and happy and that they do not even notice my self-care techniques anymore.  That is all I can ask for!

    I would love to hear other takes on this topic.

    Happy Trails,  JWD  T1 since 1963.

     

     

    Cult of Personality
    Posted: Mar 16, 2009 13:06:35 2 Comments.
  • Report this Post
  • Comment on this Post
  • Anna you have set me to thinking about the connection between diabetes and personality.  I would love to hear from other T-1s out there on their views about how diabetes has effected their personality.  I do believe there is a connection.

    For me, the first 15-20 years or so of diabetes, I spent a great deal of time and energy attempting to prove to myself and others that I could do anything that a non-diabetic could do.  As a result, I spent these years in denial of my disease and its effects.  I guess the best I can say about those years is that I survived it and in one piece.  But, how I survived it is still a mystery.

    I left home at the age of 15.  Between the ages of 15 and 20, I lived where I could, with relatives, friends or even sharing rent with other displaced teenagers.  I traveled around the US and did my fair share of hitch-hiking.  I saw and experienced life in a way that was both exciting and frightening.  And during this whole adventure, I kept up with my denial of diabetes.  Many people that knew me during this period would have laughed it you told them I was a T-1.  How much of this denial was caused by the disease itself or maybe by the era of women's liberation or by my own stubborn nature, I will most likely never know.  I do know, that as a result of these experiences, my personality was altered.

    By age 20 I earned my high school diploma and was accepted at a state univerity.  I was one of the oldest dorm dwellers that first two years and gained many lasting friendships.  I decided that since I survived to age 20 without trying, I would try the next 20 years and see what happened.  After 15-20 years as a diabetic and I was just beginning to accept that it is real.  And this acceptance did aid in my personal developement.  I graduated with a teaching degree, got married, worked in many different arenas and went back to school and received a MA in Counseling.

    So, I made it to 40, still in one piece and I thought it must be time to try even harder as a T-1 and become as healthy as I could be.  It is diffeniatly a work in progress.  It is a true balancing act to be chronically ill and not be consumed by the ilness(es).  For about the last 6 years or so, I have been traveling (mostly by train) back and forth to The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.  Mayo has added much to my health and wellbeing.  So far they have saved my eyesite (as a motorcyclist this is important as there is no such thing as a "seeing eye hog.") and they have helped me to regain awareness of blood sugar highs and lows.  I consider Mayo the "One-Stop-Shopping" experience for the chronically ill.  Where I live in Michigan, if I am to take care of all my medical needs, I would have to travel all over the state and see as many as 15 or so doctors.  But at Mayo I can do it all in one place and get the best medical care that is available.  My illness is an expensive hobby, but the end results are proving to be worth all the time and money.

    What has all this to do with diabetes and personality?  For one, I am a real character!  I am unique and different and fun and funny and deep and soulful and resiliant and resourceful and intelligent.  Can I prove that diabetes is the cause and effect?  I doubt it, but in my heart I know that I would not be who I am as a person without the experiences given to me as a result of my disease.

    Happy Trails,

    jwd T-1 since 1963

     

    Perfectionism
    Posted: Mar 13, 2009 12:48:35 1 Comment.
  • Report this Post
  • Comment on this Post
  • Perfectionism, noun; A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.  American Heritage Dictionary. 

      As a child of two critical parents and a T1 Diabetic, I struggle with perfectionism every day of my life.  It has only been the last decade or so, that I have successfully stopped being obsessed with being perfect.

    In some ways I believe that perfectionism has caused more damage than the disease of diabetes itself.  The ideal of being perfect has a powerful hold on most of us, and it is expected in our culture.  We are obsessed with being "Number One."  Or as a one t-shirt pointed out to me, "Number Two Is Only The First Loser."   The power of the mind over the body is well documented and even Western Medicine has come to accept the power of the mind over disease. 

    I tend to average eight to twelve finger sticks per day.  And eight to twelve times a day I am grading myself on my ability to be a "compliant" diabetic (right now the grade is 77).  Since 1980, when I bought my 1st glucose meter, at a cost of $300, I have been grading myself on a blood glucose scale.  Prior to 1980, I was graded, but on a different scale, 1st with urine in a test tube, then with urine on a strip.  These techniques relied on a color chart that graded on a negative, 1+, 2+, 3+, 4+ scale, and sometimes could be subjective.  All of this number crunching has reinforced the need to be perfect.

    So, one day I woke up and decided not to be perfect.  Just like that, I began making a conscious choice to allow good, to be good enough.  At 1st this was difficult and frustrating but I continued to try to be "human" and not "perfect."  Still today I fight the allusion of perfection by intentionally making mistakes and consciously deciding that being good is better than being perfect.  The 1st thing I noticed is that my blood sugars came down and my HbA1c began to hover at approximately 6.1%.  Now, I was really intrigued with my grading/perfect concept and I wondered where it might take me.

    I constantly remind myself that Mother Nature herself, is not perfect and if this is true, than why did I expect any different from myself or others?  Once I began to grasp the idea I found that I was able to laugh and sing and dance without self censure.  What freedom, at least in my mind, from the constant worry about the what ifs in regards to diabetes.  This disease is not entirely understood by the medical community, so I have to give myself a break and allow myself some wiggle room.  I know myself better than anyone else (including the diabetic police), so I continue to find my way through this world,  without holding my breath or suffering sweaty palms.

     

    Spring Fever
    Posted: Mar 7, 2009 14:45:38 2 Comments.
  • Report this Post
  • Comment on this Post
  • March came in like a lamb here in Michigan.  In one day, most of the winter snow is gone.  Yesterday, Friday, the weather was as clear and sunny as the Great Lakes allow.  Now, today it is foggy and the rain is washing away most of the snow that is left.  Our 1/2 mile driveway is a sea of mud, not yet fit for a vehicle with only two wheels.  So, what is a motorcyclist with Spring Fever to do?

    The most a motorcyclist can do is start up the bike, listen to the motor and dream of open road ahead.  I have already begun to look at maps and day-dream about possible trips not too far from home.  My motorcycle female friends and I are planning a long weekend up in Traverse City, MI.  We hope to make this the 1st Annual of many trips to come. 

    I was given my 1st bike when I was 12 years old.  I road dirt bikes for years with my dad.  Within two years of starting college as an undergrad, I had purchase my 1st Harley.  It was advertised as a 1958 Honda and knowing that Honda did not start in the USA until the early 1960s I was intrigued.  I took a friend with me and off to the rural areas we traveled in search of the allusive 1958 "Honda."

    We arrived at a small house with many vehicles in the driveway.  When the man came out to meet us we tried hard to appear relaxed.  Even though my insides were jumping and my head was spinning because all I wanted was to learn the truth about the mystery bike.  I could hardly contain myself as he lead us into a packed garage.

    As my eyes adjusted to the light I began to make out the shape of a classic, old school, pan head.  The bike, now identified as a 1958 FL Harley-Davidson, was painted a nondescript green and off white.  She had her full bat wing fairing and windshield, an old style sportster banana seat and glorious bullet style saddle bags.  I could not believe my eyes.  The owner did not know it yet, but he had just sold his HD!

    By the time we left that day, I had purchased not only a pan head but also a 1971 Triumph Fast Back, 2 seater sports car (one of only 1500 made for the USA).  I purchased both vehicles for $5000.  I could not believe my good fortune.  I felt like I had come home at last.

    Four years later, I married my current husband, Dan.  He assured me that he could ride motorcycles, so I gave him the 1958.  Dan is a big man and would have less trouble kick starting the pan head than I would.  So the search began for an electric start motorcycle for my 5'3" frame.  It took four years to find my 1976 FLH Bagger.  And twenty-two years later I joined the 21st Century and bought a 2005 Road King EFI Police Bike.  If I am true to form, I will most likely ride the Road King for another twenty years.

    Off I go to stroke and fondle my bike and get it ready for the new riding season.  Happy Trails!

     

     

    A New Study
    Posted: Mar 5, 2009 14:28:06 1 Comment.
  • Report this Post
  • Comment on this Post
  • First I would like to say that I am thrilled with the responses to my entries on this website.  It is so easy to feel alone with Type I.  And yet, there are so many of us with similar experiences.  It is a joy to feel connected.

    The new study mentioned in the title just came to my attention yesterday on March 4th about 2pm EST.  I received a call from the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) in Miami, FL.  The DRI is planning a long term (10 year) study on subjects that received an Islet Cell Implant.  I am so excited I could spit! 

    Just recently I started to feel well enough to jump back into the "Cure Community."  I would love to become a spokes person for Type I Diabetics and a need for a cure.  I love public speaking and think that I could help with a little cause and effect.  So, the call from the DRI was exactly what I needed to get my rear in gear and get back out and fight the good fight.  I will do my best to keep all y'all posted. 

     

    Short & Nutra-Sweet
    Posted: Mar 2, 2009 15:24:09 3 Comments.
  • Report this Post
  • Comment on this Post
  • I am so excited!  This is my very 1st attempt at a blog.  I have been told by many diabetic professionals that I should consider sharing my thoughts and ideas in a blog.  diabetes1.org seems like a safe place to start.  I did post a comment on the cure forum with most of my demographic info, but here it is in a nutshell:  46 years type I diabetic, 1st person in the USA to receive an Islet Cell Implant with IV Bone Morrow Infusion.  I unfortunately rejected 20 months later.  The procedure did not work for me, however the failure of my Implant aided research to refine the procedure which has helped others with Type I. 

    RSS

    Problem Solving Part 2
    Medication And Meals During Sickness- Diabetes Problem Solving
    How to choose the right medication and meals while sick....
    more more Featured Videos
    Cost Savings Tool
    Do you know the annual cost of managing your diabetes? Would you like to find ways to reduce your costs? Calculate your total budget and identify ways to save money. You can do this in just a few minutes by entering facts about the products you use. This quick analysis will provide you with a comprehensive overview of both spending and potential savings.

    Cost Savings Tool
    Monitor Comparison Tools
    Blood glucose monitors offer an easy way to test your blood sugar at home or on the go. Use this comparison tool as a guide to learn more about the features and benefits of your current monitor or to find a new one.
    Handheld Monitor Comparison
    Continuous Glucose Monitor Comparison
    Advanced BMI Calculator
    Ever wonder if you are at a healthy weight? Then enter your height and weight in our advanced Body Mass Index (BMI) calculator. This tool provides you with two important numbers reflecting the estimated impact of your present body weight and shape upon your overall health.
    Advanced BMI Calculator
    more Care Tools
    Home | About Us | Press | Make a Suggestion | Content Syndication | Terms of Service | Editorial Policy | Privacy Policy
    Last updated: Jun 19, 2019  © 2019 Body1 All rights reserved.