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Anna's Blog

Anna's Blog
By: FatCatAnna

The Roller Coaster Ride of Diabetes! Whoo! Whoo!

I am a Type 1 diabetic diagnosed back in the early 60's as a child.  I am living in Montreal, Canada and enjoy scribbling about diabetes from time to time. I’ve had my ups / downs just like any person would experience with going through life - diabetic or not.  My motto in life?  Diabetes does not control me – I control it!! 

You can find more posts/discussions at my Facebook page called "The Roller Coaster Ride of Diabetes" and also on Twitter under the name of FatCatAnna.  Feel free to follow me at both places or send me a private message!


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 Blog Entries
Midnight Three and Six and artificial pancreas technology - Jan 27
I came across a story called Midnight Three and Six on The New York Times website today.  I am utterly floored by the short documentary that accompanies the article. ...
more
Wearing a dress with medical gadgets - Jan 24
I've always been abit of a fashionista ... I live in Montreal ... that doesn't help ... as fashion abounds here.  Despite working from a home office, and just lounging ...
more
My First Night with Dexcom G4 CGMS - Dec 24
As I suspected, the basal settings that I’ve got overnight on my insulin pump Ziggy are a wee bit too much.  A month ago, Animas Canada sent a CDE over to see ...
more
Welcome Ziggy Stardust - Dec 23
... my new Animas One Touch PING (I think of the game ping pong with that name) insulin pump that I started on yesterday aka Ziggy and his side kick Stardust - the ...
more
Pre-op visit with endo at hospital - Nov 25
I’d written earlier about going for pre-op for surgery (which has now been cancelled and moved up to January for some reason – so more time for me to dwell ...
more
Midnight Three and Six and artificial pancreas technology
Posted: Jan 27, 2015 13:48:40 0 Comments.
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  • I came across a story called Midnight Three and Six on The New York Times website today.  I am utterly floored by the short documentary that accompanies the article.  It's llike looking at myself (and maybe you will feel the same) in the same story line.  This is how many of us live our lives. Though for some of us, I know for myself, it's just always been what I do having had Type 1 diabetes for so long.

    The documentary shows a Mum’s efforts to manage her 15 year old daughter Grace's daily struggle with a life-threatening condition.  It is something we can all relate to, and watching this made me abit teary eyed at times.  It is the fear of the Mum with her daughter going low at night that really struck me.  Having the Dexcom now, I can relate - annoying at times ... but it's been useful for me to catch the hypo earlier, and not deal with crazy highs the next day if I have slept through it ... or over dealt with fixing it due to panic.

    The goal of this documentary is to show others that don't quite understand the difference between Type 1 and 2.  I think it really brings it across very well.

    They are hoping to raise funds for Grace to have an artificial pancreas by the time she turns 20.  

    ```````````````

    On top of this story I came across one from last week about a 4-year-old in Australia receiving the world’s first artificial pancreas.  Also, Jane Reid, from New South Wales, is going to be fitted with the pump (this may have already occured since the articles publication) making her the first adult to be fitted with the device. 

    After 5 years of clinical studies a new insulin pump is now commercially available in Australia for children and adults (wonder when it will be available here in North America?). It can mimic the biological function of the pancreas, stopping insulin delivery when glucose level drops, avoiding a low blood glucose. When glucose level recovers, the artificial pancreas recognises this and resumes insulin delivery. I'm sure that there is still human interaction with this, just like there is with the devices I use, but it's a step in the right direction, despite it being yet again another money "Pharma rules" device that some of can or can't afford.

    It's still not the same thing as a "real" pancreas, or a CURE - so the title about this little lad having an "artificial pancreas" is a wee bit misleading.   That's my opinion of course, as I pat Ziggy (my Animas Ping pump) on my left side of my waistband nd my Dexcom CGMS on the other side.

    Now isn't he just the cutest little Superman or what????

     Above photo courtesy of http://encomium.ng/

     

    NB: For more insight into the discussiion of "artificial pancreas" - check out Craig Idlebrook's post at Insulin Nation

    Wearing a dress with medical gadgets
    Posted: Jan 24, 2015 18:39:12 0 Comments.
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  • I've always been abit of a fashionista ... I live in Montreal ... that doesn't help ... as fashion abounds here.  Despite working from a home office, and just lounging around in comfy clothing, sometimes I like to go out and become a wild cat ... and slick my fur  to look elegant and demure ;)

    Since going onto the pump in 2008, I've had to change the type of clothing I wear due to accessing the pump to bolus and do other functions.  I had tried a thigh holder, but sadly the lady no longer makes them, and didn't give me much advise on where to get the products she used to make them. I attempted to make a few, from similar materials, but failed. Testing them out meant the pump was dropping as far as the tubing it would allow it to go as the spandex leg band I'd made slid further, further down.

    Diabetes Depot, a Canadian company (and run by a few staff with diabetes - including the pharmacist Tino Montopoli) deals with products for diabetics.   He sells the American product called GirlyGoGarter.  I did some research on it last year, but the website/Tino didn't have much info about measurements for the thigh area.  Because it's considered lingerie, you cannot return it, so if I had ordered up the incorrect size, I would have been stuck with something I couldn't use. 

    They show women with just about everything but the kitchen sink in this velcro held lacy/strechy band around the upper thigh that is backed with a rubber type of material (similar to what you would find with stay up stockings).  They are running, dancing, walking and with what many of them have stuffed into it, it's not going down.  So, I was sold and decided to order one this week despite the no return policy (it's lingerie so can't be returned like many stores do).

    For myself, I am doing some test runs with it, and as you see in the picture below, with my insulin pump Ziggy and his side kick Dexcom receiver ... there is more room for other medical devices like the FreeStyle Lite meter that I may place in one of the many pockets on the lace band.  You can place items within the lace bit like I've done OR for security, there is a inner spandex band that will hold things more secure.  I gave it a good test, running up/down stairs,  chasing the cats around the house, sitting down, getting up ... no slippage unlike the other leg pump holders I've had over the years.

    I don't usually promote devices that are commercially made, but for diabetic gals who like to wear a dress from time to time ... I'm giving this a thumbs up. 

    The nice thing is, even if I go to MDI (multiple dose injections) like I do from time to time when I take a pump break ... this will still come in handy to keep my needles, etc. if I don't wish lug an over the shoulder boulder holder and at same times have my hands free! 

    Check out the website for more info ... and if you live in Canada ... you can buy it directly from Diabetes Depot for $39.95.  The measurements are pretty accurate and the suggestion of going to a smaller size worked out for me. My thigh measurement was just at the beginning of the largest size possible in their product line.  If I had not done this, it would be too large.

    Hope this helps any of you facing similar situations of where to keep medical devices, other objects that will leave you looking less bulking with devices around your waist line, etc.

    Back to dreaming of being in warm climate ... with bare legs (oh - this only works on bare legs ... but according to GirlyGoGarter ... they are working on a new product that will be for those women who wear it over tights, etc.)

    NB:  I had written a blog a few years ago with a link for instructions to make one ... I have yet to give that a go ... but if you can't afford to buy one ... have the time ... check out this link to learn how.  One day, I'll manage to find the time, but I just happened to luck in on having some cash to splash for a treat to myself.

    My First Night with Dexcom G4 CGMS
    Posted: Dec 24, 2014 11:22:39 0 Comments.
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  • As I suspected, the basal settings that I’ve got overnight on my insulin pump Ziggy are a wee bit too much.  A month ago, Animas Canada sent a CDE over to see me (also a pump wearer) – to go over my settings in my pump program as I was having issues with high blood sugars with menopause.

    Psst - if you want to see a full size of above to see descriptions - go to this link - sorry Diabetes1.org doesn't allow me to load up larger pics

    I actually didn’t get going on the pump until about 3 weeks after seeing her, when I decided to get off MDI (I go back / forth between pumping and MDI).  After 2 weeks of battling lows at night, tweaking basal settings, I lucked in on getting the DEXCOM G4 (see my day before blog on this).

    As I went to bed last night, I started seeing the trend going down and put the pump into temporary basal setting.  A few hours later, alarms started,  (freaking out the cat under the sheets – she likes to cuddle up to me at night) – DH … slept right thru’ like a baby (which is usual <lol>).  At that point, because I’m a smart kitty kat, I “lowered” my basal setting abit more.

    Little did I know, in my hypo state, I was actually INCREASING!!!

    So, here I was dipping in the upper 2ish mmol/l (40 mg/dl) range and thinking – “wow – this is the greatest things since sliced bread” and “no wonder I’ve been tired so much lately, I’ve been sleeping through all of these lows that are alarming”.

    Come 0600, with alarming / vibrations almost every ½ hour … I decided in my infinite wisdom to lower the temporary basal setting ….  and when I looked at the history of the basal’s … BING … I’d increased instead of lowered.

    Scary stuff – lesson learnt – that sometimes the Hypo Fairy makes me a dumb diabetic – who doesn’t think before they press buttons. 

    Overall though, I think this will be a useful tool for me.  If only this tool was available to every diabetic that wants it or even better, if your diabetic clinic/endo could loan you one at a lower cost than what a personal one costs.  I would splash out the cash, with the hopes that insurance might cover part of it.

    Sadly, when asking the endo at the Lakeshore hospital that I went to for pre-op earlier iin November – if this was available … no (and neither is Diasend for them to see how you are doing).  The same applies to my other two doctors I see for health concerns.

    On the bright side of all this, the Animas CDE has told me of a new young doctor, in my neck of the woods of Montreal that is seeking insulin pump clients.  She said I’d be a good patient to help him learn the ropes, while he’s training with Animas Canada.  I sort of like that idea, and the fact I’ll finally have a doctor that will get what I’m saying when I talk about my insulin pump.

    Things are looking good for the New Year for … Ziggy … Stardust … and _______________ fill in blank for name of Dexcom D4 (if you can think of a neat name – let me know).

    So, now I’m going to slink away from the desktop, get cracking on my visitors arriving today (ehgads the house is a mess), and I’ll see you all in the New Year (have promised myself and visitors I will not work during the holidays … easier said than done, but I’ll try my best).

    Welcome Ziggy Stardust
    Posted: Dec 23, 2014 16:36:14 0 Comments.
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  • ... my new Animas One Touch PING (I think of the game ping pong with that name) insulin pump that I started on yesterday aka Ziggy and his side kick Stardust - the OneTouch meter remote (no more lifting my skirts up to reveal my knickers to the world when I want to do a bolus).  

    It will take abit of getting used to how much blood Stardust uses compared to Limoncello - my FreeStyle Lite (who will remain as my standby for days I can't squeeze out large droplets of vampire blood.

    I had wanted to change to the Vibe, which has the CGMS option on it's screen which is an extra $200 (the PING is $6,995).  I paid for it on my credit card that is allowing an extra 1 year warranty on it on top of the 4 year warranty you get with the pump (having had previous probs with the 2020 - I wanted to ensure I had 1 extra year more).  I'm one smart cookie aren't I?  Well, you won't think so after reading the following.

    Laws here in Canada do NOT allow you to change your mind once you've purchased a pump ... even if the box isn't opened - live and learn - or move to US of A - where you have better consumer protection - from some of the thread discussion I've read on forums.   

    So, tonight - it's installing a Dexcom G4 sensor - the transmitter and receiver was given to me by islet cell transplant - who now insulin free (whoo! whoo!)  from Alberta.   I may continue to use it out of pocket once the Christmas present of box of sensors that my Animas rep gave to me (ususallly a box of 4 will set you back $340 for a month supply - cha ching) - runs out.

    One thing I am finding out about the Dexcom ... after reading/watching the videos on their site.  They keep on telling you that ... the CGMS does not replace your blood meter ... that whatever your CGMS tell you - that you should go with what your finger prick #BGNow number is.  This is one thing I did not realise when looking into the CGMS.  I knew a blood test had to be done a few times a day - but not some of what I came across at this link.  Therefore, you still have to purchase perhaps as many blood test strips as you had before, in order to stay in a good BG zone.

    So, between testing still with the finger sticks as some of us call them - and then to justify the the $7K yearly cost is abit scary (like buying a used car every year as my DH put it to me - men are so practical when it comes to justifying a purchase).   Thank goodness for DTC here in Canada as well, but we have yet to see how much we can claim since I was approved a few years ago ... it's sitting down ... pulling out past income taxes, etc. etc.  aka - we'd rather be sailing - than crunching numbers.  Thoough my DH says he'll keep on working as long as he has to for affording these items - but the rotten thing is ... he's able to retire next year after 35 years. 

    GUILT!!!

    Can you tell that I feel so guilty that my DH has to work longer due to my diabetes at times?  That shows you how much someone loves you when they give up their retirement plans for you (his are sailing around the world - but you never know - maybe we'll be able to do it).

    So, here's to the next adventure with devices from Animas .... 

    Pre-op visit with endo at hospital
    Posted: Nov 25, 2014 23:32:04 2 Comments.
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  • I’d written earlier about going for pre-op for surgery (which has now been cancelled and moved up to January for some reason – so more time for me to dwell on … do I go for it / or not?).  At the time the pre-op team didn’t realize I was a Type 1 diabetic for some reason, and red flags went up when I questioned them what to do with my insulin pump regime.  Especially for my after care with 3 day hospital stay for recovery.  The pre-op doctor had said that they had 2 endocrinologists that understood how to work with patients with pumps.  That excited me to no end, as I’ve never had an endo/GP with that knowledge.  I’m self taught in most aspects of how I control my diabetes health, by keeping up with latest technology, discussing it with my medical team, and they allow me to self guinea pig myself with what I want to try.  I am my own boss behind what I do with my health care for diabetes – but sometimes it can get exhausting – but I refuse to give into burnout from diabetes. 

    Fast forward, I arrived at the clinic in the Lakeshore Hospital.  The diabetic clinic was a small place, with patients waiting (during the time I was there - one guy was glugging water like he was a fish out of water –  sprinting to the loo to pee like a horse – sadly the door does not have good sound barrier …. uhhhmmm – diabetic out of control with their ???).  I asked the receptionist, out of curiosity sake, if patients were able to share their pump/blood glucose information via Internet to their office (I use Diasend with my Animas pump).  I think she was almost embarrassed and a few of the staff members behind her as well, when she said “No”.  Oh, Oh, …. I’m thinking to myself … am I wasting my time coming to this clinic?   I looked around at various info on walls and in the hand out sections … everything … geared for Type 2 diabetics.  Hot flash started due to panic mode at that point.  I am ready to run out of the hospital!!

    Hour and half later, sweating like a pig due to being dressed for cold weather (and that day we were experiencing unusual high temps of 18C in Montreal – ovey) – I see the endo.   She gets down to asking me my history.   My saying how long I’d had Type 1 diabetes seemed to floor her and at that point I wish I’d said … I’ve only had diabetes for 15 years, which she had thought I’d said when I’d told her I was coming close to year 50 of diagnosis (I joked about applying for the Joslin award – I was nervous at this point – white coat syndrome as usual).

    Then we got to my insulin regime.  I told her I was currently on MDI (multiple dose injections) – but planning to go onto pump again on December 1st since I thought I had figured out the right dosage for my basal portion of my insulin regime with Levemir.  She seemed puzzled by my not taking the same amount for each meal (I explained it depended on the blood sugar (BG) reading at the time, my I:C ratio, ISF ).  I asked her if she understood what TDD meant?  A term used in the pumping world for Total Daily Dose … she did – but she didn’t seem that interested. 

    At this point, I knew I was not seeing an endo with full knowledge of pump experience (as she spoke to me – I slowly undid George Michael’s battery cap, and slunk him iaway for future use).  She admitted that not many people use insulin pumps, and that even the largest diabetic centre in Montreal isn’t as well.  For my upcoming surgery, she does NOT want me on my insulin pump but to stay on the regime I'm on at present.  She wants me on my current regime but RN's will be under my orders … if I am with it …  otherwise they will follow the protocol the endo has written out - which scares me .... on the order form she has put down that I take 4 units of NovoRapid for each meal – which I told her could send me into hypo land if a) I had a low blood sugar; or b) I didn’t eat all the food on the tray).  Gulp.

    This is obviously not the United States of America – where I’ve heard from other insulin pump users going into surgery, sometimes wearing a pump.  There are no CDE’s able to help you manage your health … not at least in Quebec where doctors are Gods.  No pharmacist or CDE can help assist you in your health regime – so you suffer while you await to see a specialist.

    Wait though, there is some good out of this visit.  She wants to see me in February, and she is actually going to be testing me for celiac disease, which is common among Type 1 diabetics.  I had asked previous doctors for this test, and they’d look at me like I was off my block.

     

    The other thing that was interesting about this so called “pre-op” visit.  My feet were examined by her doing a few tests which she says should be done every year for diabetics by a doctor.  I have NEVER EVER had my feet examined by a doctor.  She was amazed at the sensitivity of my feet, ability to still feel (I joked about not wearing socks with sandals, only as a child with my parents did I have to do that – memories of being made fun of by American kids at a beach in Maine one year will never be erased from my sponge brain).  IIf I’d known she was going to do this, I would have washed them.  Luckily, she said my feet were in amazing shape …. again the emphasis was due to how long I’d been diabetic.  It’s like … what … am I supposed to have dinosaur looking feet or ????

    Yes, I’m scared.  I want to cancel the surgery even more so now.  Time to write a letter to my surgeon.  I must stop procrastinating!

    I have a month to decide
    Posted: Nov 17, 2014 20:11:37 0 Comments.
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  • The-sea-of-time by Kyle Bean - http://www.kylebean.co.uk/

    If any of you read my posts on Facebook or Twitter, you’ll have noticed that I’ve been going through some little health problems that are compromising the control of my #diabetes.  It’s nothing serious, just the usual “woman” issues that occur as we get on in life. 

    Just last week, I went for a pre-op for a partial hysterectomy ( 1-2 hours of slice ‘n dice time for my surgeon and moi).  It’s to remove some large fibroids in my cervix that over the past 30+ years HAD (and I stress this with caps) become painful.  When I finally saw the gynecologist (gyno) back in June, I was a bleeding mess (menses lasting up to a month), slightly anemic due to blood loss, along with discomfort from pressure of fibroids against the bladder, I was exhausted (thyroid problems weren’t helping there).  I’ve always thought I had a bladder built like a truck driver; I can go on forever without having to take a wee.  Not so anymore, pressure of fibroids … hmmm, you want that truck load of bananas to arrive still green … pick another driver.

    While she’s down there in the nether regions, due to my age, she’s going to remove the uterus since I’m at the age where I’m too old to have a kittens.  Recovery time of 4-6 weeks.  I’m fine with that, with diabetic mastopathy surgery back in 2009  – I was back on my feet faster then a speeding bullet.  Though this maybe abit different with the act of sitting on the throne and pushing out a load of crap!

    What initially lead me to write this #dblog (aka my online diary that some people read) was after the blood work/EKG.  The RN, who after going instructions for what I was to do the night before surgery, etc. told me …   “that was it.  You are free to go home”.  I then stupidly asked the RN, “what about my insulin coverage for diabetes on that day?”  I told her I’d be probably back on the pump at that time since I’m on a break from it due to not having greatest control of #BGNow.  Hormonal issues with peri-menopause have increased my TDD (total daily dosage) to …. 60% and I was having infusion site issues with larger doses of insulin!!!  Really, it’s like I’m a T2D (Type 2 diabetic) with insulin resistance – and no – with my #dblog post in October – my endo refuses to allow me to take metformin to help control this resistance - urrrhhhh.  Sadly,  I don’t see my GP until end of January 2015 to see if she’ll consider allowing me to try this out (she was the one that allowed me to go onto Synthroid since my endocronolgist aka endo had refused).  I also explain to the RN, that in past surgery’s my endo signs papers to allow me to take full control of my insulin regime once I’m conscious.

    So, the RN decides I will need to talk to a doctor at this point.  A short wait of an hour (I was catching up on a few English newspapers that I don’t receive where I live in Montreal – I was in heaven – reading about local stuff) – I get to see the doctor.  He goes over my medications, tells me to stop a few before the surgical date.  He asks me what my #BG (blood glucose) average is.  I tell him the story of my recent roller coaster ride with the #BG.   The only good thing about my telling him this …. I’m now maybe going to see one of the two endo’s that understand pump technology, but … and this will be hard for me … I’m supposed to keep my lips zipped on the fact I already have an endocrinologist (who sadly does not understand pump technology and is just my pimp for prescriptions).

    On top of all that’s swirling in my sponge brain, is the hospital I went to.  It has not got the greatest reputation and I personally avoid it at all costs (though according to one #PWD (person with diabetes) – it’s improved).  BTW, I detest hospitals, white jackets.  I’m probably not alone in this statement, especially when it comes to medical staff not understanding the complexities of #diabetes and those of us on an insulin regime that maybe is not by their “book standards”.  I’m self-taught in what I do with both MDI (multiple dose injecting) / insulin pumping, due to being unable to find help where I live.

    So now after all of this scribble, I am now in peri-menopause since August, no more keeping Protecter & Gamble’s stock up with purchasing sanitary supplies (that we get taxed on in Canada of 15% ovey!! – what a bloody rip off).  Anyway, I wasn’t expecting was to go into peri-menopause, and guess what?  No more discomfort, pain.  According to what I’ve read, fibroids shrink at this point in time, which does not necessitate having surgery. 

    So, I’m on the fence post whether I should just cancel the surgery, or go ahead.  What would you do in my case?  Preserve your stomach for future MDI and infusion sets (while I healed from the 4-6” incision there will be less real estate for me to play with)?

    3rd Annual World Diabetes Twitter Marathon
    Posted: Nov 13, 2014 16:44:17 0 Comments.
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  • I've been abit behind in many things #diabetes these past few months, while I deal with other health disorders that are making my usual control of diabetes go out of balance (e.g. today was surgery pre op day - what an interesting experience that was ... again ... #dblog in the making when I can find some time to put my thoughts together).  

    I am excited to at least post this little ditty though before the day is over, about tomorrow's upcoming event for World Diabetes Day, that I'm hoping I can at least attend for a few "sessions". 

    The World Diabetes Day twitter chat will begin at 12 am ET on Friday, November 14th and end at 11:59 pm EST that evening. 

    To find out more details (e.g. a link to help those of you in different time zones - so you don't miss out on your fav #diabetes celebrity/etc.) then go directly to the DCAF (Diabetes Community Advocacy Foundation) website at this link .  

    Also, if you are new to Twitter, and find it a challenge like I do at times for this type of fast paced reading/posting - go to TweetChat (remove the automatic Diabetes1.org frame by clicking on the "Remove the Frame" on the left hand side of your screen) then once you are seeing the "clean" page - simply type in #WDDChat14 in the search window to gain access to the  chat session on one page with no fancy ads, etc.  I find it much easier to keep up with the streaming (oh I sound so "with it in cyber world don't I?).  See ya can teach an old cat new tricks \\^,,^//    *** See update at bottom :) ***

    Now, if my above suggestions doesn't quite suit your style - then check out other options to join in on the discussion at this link.

    Hope to "see" you there at some pooint during the day !!!  

     

    NB:  Update to accesssing the chat sessions without pulling out your hair.  I'm not on a mobile so perhaps that is reason for above not working for me (I use my lap top for these types of discussions).  What I am finding works best for keeping up with the fast paced discussion is the following ...      .... so far I don't seem to be missing out on posts, and my ability to put in my "two cents worth" is going through.  Many thanks to Brenda Bell for this tip 

    Questioned by my pharmacist on my insulin regime
    Posted: Oct 15, 2014 21:26:46 0 Comments.
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  • Have you ever had a heart to heart talk with your pharmacist who delivers your “legal” drugs? I know that a few of my American D-mates only deal with online pharmacies – and I’ve always wondered about that – other than them telling you you’re not covered by your insurance – do you ever have a chat with someone who is wondering why you take the meds you do to maintain your health and knows what your talking about?

    While I find the right dose with Synthroid for my thyroid aka Hashimoto disease  (hi yaaaa - karate chop to the head!!!!).  I’ve been requesting my GP to increase my dosage to get myself to a level of TSH that makes me feel happy – and she’s willing to go along with me as I experiment <lol> - which was my reason for my pharmacy visit at Costco today). I decided at the same time to order up some fast acting insulin since I was getting low on my current bottle (I only order up 1 at a time). I use NovoRapid, which I’ve been using for as long as I can remember, whenever it came onto the market (remember – I’ve been thru’ many vials since ’67 – I don’t have the memory to retain all the various types over those years – there’s better things to remember than … which one was I using back in 1984 – and who knows – some of you will remember what you used – me … nope … I just remember my fav bevy … Brador beer from across the river in Hull in the disco days – “ I want action – I got so much to give – I love the night life – I got to boogie “ .....

    I paid up for all my goodies (of course – who doesn’t want to throw in a few bottles of test strips – let’s get the party going – whoot! whoot! long live the punctured fingertip). Then the cashier told me that the pharmacist wanted to talk to me before they handed over what I'd just paid for. Hmmm, only time they’ve done that is for a new med. What could it be?

    Apparently, the pharmacist couldn’t understand why I had long lasting insulin on my file. I explained the story of George Michael – my Animas 2020 pump – being out of warranty – dying on Dec 31/15  - no longer using him when I went on airline trips with no warranty, etc. and having to resort to using the old – bend over –throw the dart aka needle into your behind like a pro dart player!!! Bull’s eye!!!  Along with my trial with Levemir insulin for my long lasting regime - which I didn't do so well with due to allergic reactions (that was new to her - and she was very interested).

     

    All over, it was a very interesting discussion for us both - I learned a few things about her trade - and she too about what I do within the diabetic community aka DOC. She said she only knows what she learned at school about Type 1 diabetes – and talking to me – made her appreciate what we go through – and what works for each of us (no one system works for another person – we are all different with our control of our health).

    And with this short little blog – I bid you adieu for the evening – while I prepare to head to Jenna’s Journey tomorrow – to put her to sleep for the winter months on her comfy little cradle that will keep her upright out of the water. It’s been a busy past few weeks getting her prepared for the winter. I am not looking forward to the next 8 months on dry land as you can tell. Sigh – dreaming already of next year’s adventures on her.

    When You're Hot, You're Hot
    Posted: Oct 3, 2014 13:41:54 0 Comments.
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  • Jerry Reed's song title above - is what made me get all squirmy and excited about writing this #dblog post today.

    This winter our heating bill for the house will be reduced drastically.  That is if my DH can withstand <16 C (60 F) temps all the time.  A recent holiday on our sailboat aka Jenna’s Journey, where the cabin temperatures at night dipped as low as 4C, with a duvet on top of “us” to keep us warm over the night, along with the v-berth that we sleep in, with the door closed ….  Well, the “us” means my DH was all huddled comfortably under the covers, whilst I had thrown them aside, tossing & turning in a sweaty hot heat. 

    The other aspect of my hot flushes.  My skin has an even rosier glow to it (I have rosacea), and people say I look so healthy and young (see glistening skin below <lol>).  Meanwhile, as they babble on, I’m sweating like a pig and wishing I could plunge into the Arctic Ocean. 

    The above two statements are the pro bit of this little ditty.

    Yes, the sexy illusion of "glistening skin", especially in-between the girls is a right turn on for some blokes.  Sadly, my DH is a solid sleeper, so he missed out on that aspect of my night sweats lately.  For me, it’s becoming a bloody nightmare, along with sleep deprivation if the temps aren’t cool enough for me.

    Oh and the mood swings (never had those before) … I even scare myself at times – it’s like I’m watching a psycho movie and I’m staring in it ( strike a poise Madonna style).  I talked to some people at various ports during our holidays, and their advise when you’re about to blow off steam …. COUNT TO TEN J

    So, as we all know, mucked up sleep can screw up a lot of things.  Our bodies were meant to have a good solid sleep (whether it be 4 or 12, depending on the individual, solid … no waking up inbetween … is the best type of sleep).

    For myself, with all this hormonal imbalance with T1 diabetes, Hashimoto’s, menopause … my blood sugars are going right whacky over the past year.   My A1c has gone up from it’s usual 6% level I’ve had over the past 4 years to my last blood test where it was 7.2%.  With the last few months of blood tests I’ve performed, where I seem to average 12 mmol/l ( mg/dl) – I think I’m going to be seeing an even higher number. 

    Yes, a higher A1c number is freaking me out at the moment, but not so much as my daily #BGNow (blood sugar) are.   I’m trying not to let it get to me, but it does worry me, because higher #BGNow cn lead to complications.  Waking up to 15 mmol/l ( mg/dl) – hopefully will be reduced back to a lower number.  Eventually …. I have to be patient …. not freak out.

    I’m still waiting to hear back from another T1D who claims that taking Metformin is helping them with their blood sugar control.  In the meantime, I’ll try to gather up information searching the Internet to see what I can find – to put forth to my health team. 

    So, the best I can do for now?  I’m sticking with George Michael for the ease of adjusting my basal with temporary fixes and corrections along the way.  I’m also going to do some research on natural products that will help deal with the hot flushes (that hopefully won’t screw up my diabetes control – we have to be extremely careful with naturopath medications as diabetics). 

    I don't have hot flashes

    I'm so excited
    Posted: Sep 28, 2014 16:51:29 0 Comments.
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  • I found a new way to carry my insulin pump! 

    I have a few Spibelts (I posted in the forums here about a special edition larger pocket one).  I never got that one - but am due to get another one - if I continue to wear my pump this way .... around my chest under my bra line!

    I find wearing my pump this way - it doesn't have the problem of the pocket rolling around - causing the zipper to go into my skin - annoying - but I think it's due to my increasing girth ... darn peri-menopuase (a new blog coming up on that delightful woman only thing shortly).

    If what I'm writing about doesn't make sense - then here's some pictures you can take a look at.

    Opps - slam on brakes here - technical error - sadly I'm unable to post the my personal pictures here at Diabetes1.org at the present time - instead - just hop on over to this link to see the two pictures that hopefully describe how I'm wearing GM (they are PG-13).

    Have you ever worn your Spibelt this way for your pump? 

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